Oh behave: Mi9 swallows up MSN NZ, spies gap for behaviourial advertising network

MSN NZ has launched its new corporate umbrella brand Mi9, a joint venture between Microsoft and Nine Entertainment company, in New Zealand. And, at the same time, it has also officially launched the Microsoft Media Network (MMN), which general manager Liz Fraser claims is already the country’s largest advertising network offering behavioural targeting. 

Mi9, which spans publishing, online services, data strategies, consumer insights and advertising technologies, claims to have the potential to reach up to 67 percent (2.2 million) of the New Zealand population each month and its clarion call is “imagination and intelligence underpins everything we do”. And MMN’s
16,000 behaviour segments are drawn from several data sources, including
network site visits on the likes of msn.co.nz, Ticketek, Hoyts, Beauty Clique, Entertainment Fix, MenuMania and Everybody, search keywords on Bing and one million Windows Live ID records from Hotmail and Messenger. 

The
network spans both MSN and numerous third party publishers, offering advertising sold on a CPM basis and performance-based (cost
per click and cost per acquisition) audience targeting and re-targeting buying
options.

Combined
data builds a picture of individuals and their current interests, allowing
media properties to present more relevant advertising to consumers, and
advertisers to reach very specific audiences. The approach can also be used in
conjunction with other targeting, such as geography and demographics.

“Agencies
have been asking, so we’ve taken the plunge. The right content pulls a crowd,
but publishers want data that offers a more vivid picture of target audiences.
More than knowing the kind of people they’re talking to, advertisers want a
current picture showing what people are doing online, so they can target more
receptive eyeballs and improve advertising return on investment. Behavioural targeting
is one way to do it.”

Fraser
says behavioural targeting was applicable to both big brand campaigns, where
simply knowing your creative was seen by target customers is all that matters,
and performance campaigns with customer leads and acquisition objectives.

“It
is widely accepted that behavioural targeting attracts more consumer interest.
Consumers expect it, too. The days of impersonal and displaced advertising are
gone.”

However,
the emerging era of data centric advertising added new gravity to transparency
and provisions for visitors to opt in or out of having their information
collected for the purpose of behavioural targeting. 

“It’s
incumbent on publishers to offer total transparency and consumer control. We use data to help advertisers be more
relevant. Consumers prefer contextually relevant advertising over irrelevancy
and intrusion, as long as the data isn’t personally identifiable and doesn’t
jeopardise consumer privacy.”

New technology AdEffx assured
advertisers campaigns were delivered in brand safe environments, with
unsafe content blocked in real-time to pre-emptively stop adverts being shown
next to dodgy content.

“This is a vital step in the online ad
delivery process and we believe this technology gives us a real point of
difference in this space,” she says.

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