Email marketing is lazy, but that's not a bad thing

  • Email marketing
  • August 6, 2015
  • James Kemp
Email marketing is lazy, but that's not a bad thing

“Progress isn’t made by early risers. It’s made by lazy men trying to find easier ways to do something.”

Bill Gates said he would always ‘hire a lazy person to do a difficult job’ at Microsoft ‘because a lazy person will find an easy way to do it’

I take great solace in this because I’m lazy. I spend a large amount of time working out how to do the minimum amount of work for the maximum result.

When I was a sales person I always had the least amount of customers and prospects but mine were consistently more valuable. It’s just easier to get someone to spend more rather than finding a new customer.

It’s because I’m lazy I love marketing automation. I also love it because it works. Marketing automation is technology that repeats repetitive tasks through multiple channels. I use marketing automation on my site to generate leads, enquiries and opportunities.

It works like this:

marketing automation

In all there are ten emails in the sequence. When the sequence has finished a subscriber gets weekly posts or interviews. I wrote ten emails and they got sent hundreds of thousands of times.

The content aims to be helpful and gives away ideas of how you can execute different strategies in your digital marketing. Most people will either do nothing with them or implement a small number themselves. Some will ask me to do it for them.

So what happens when you regularly send people helpful, actionable content?

They open and click. A lot.

If you don’t know much about email marketing the average email open rate is usually around 20 percent and click rates average three percent.

And the most responded to email in the sequence? It contains 10 words:

It’s personal and ‘expects’ a response.

How to get started with Marketing Automation

  1. Choose a platform http://www.infusionsoft.com/ – powerful but complex and expensive. http://www.activecampaign.com/ – cheap and simple. I use it.
  2. Start an email list – offer something that people wan’t in exchange for their email address
  3. Write eight to 15 short, helpful emails. Don’t aggressively sell. Show your expertise and value.
  4. Make occasional offers

  • James Kemp is the director of Growth HQ. (james@growthhq.co.nz)

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Riding the wave of social conversations

  • Opinion
  • March 29, 2017
  • Antony Ede
Riding the wave of social conversations

Brands are just coming of age in the new collaborative economy. Like any teenager though, a lot of their actions at the moment are a bit awkward. Most of us learnt at some point that joining in on an existing conversation is much easier than starting your own by shouting until you get someone to pay attention. But to join in and be heard means being relevant and on code, and of course the ‘on code’ bit is what brands need to work out because it is constantly changing.

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