Browsing: photography

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Nike delves into zines to celebrate the Cortez, flaunts social media stars in street style photography
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Since its debut during the 1972 Olympics, the Nike Cortez has come a long way from gracing the feet of long distance runners to the outfits of high fashion models like Bella Hadid. Now, to celebrate the shoe’s 45th anniversary, Nike NZ is dabbling in the business of zines with the launch of The Rise, a photographic exploration into self-expression and female empowerment.

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2015 told through Getty’s images
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In 2015, the Getty Images’ editorial team of photographers snapped away at many of the key news stories and events, covering more than 130,000 news, sport and entertainment events at home and around the globe: over 70,000 in entertainment, 30,000 in sport and 30,000 in news. Here’s a collection of some of the most memorable moments.

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Getty Images’ Stuart Hannagan chooses five images that shook the world
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When newspapers published images of two-year-old Aylan Kurdi, drowned, lying facedown, the world was stirred and finally realised—or perhaps remembered—the horror of the Syrian conflict. But this isn’t the first time images have significantly changed public discourse. As the following five images collated by Getty Images’ Stuart Hannagan show, images have time and time again laid bare the uglier side of life. (Warning: this article contains material that may offend some).

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With cameras increasingly in pockets, Canon continues to aim for the high ground with ‘Change your lens, change your story’
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With the rise of smartphone photography, it’s tough out there for most camera manufacturers. The experienced and enthusiast photography market is the logical place for them to play and Canon is doing just that in a new campaign to show off its lenses and the difference they can make to telling a story. PLUS: how Apple, Samsung and other mobile manufacturers are changing the industry.

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App not required
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Retinoblastoma is a deadly eye cancer that develops in children, and because the disease is so difficult to detect it often ends up stealing the sense of sight from its young victims. However, one of the easiest ways to determine whether or not someone is suffering from the disease is through the use of a smartphone—and you don’t even need an app.

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