Browsing: James Hurman

News
Yo ho ho and a bottle of multi-million dollar rum: marketing lessons from Stolen Spirits’ big sale
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Humans love a good origin story. And, in the business world, the power of the overnight success narrative often means the extremely difficult period of starting and growing a business is conveniently overlooked in the mythology. The latest Kiwi business to join that club is Stolen Spirits, which was started around five years ago in a bedroom in Mt Eden and this week sold a controlling interest to US company Liquid Asset Brands and Spirits Investment Partners for $21 million. And it’s another great example of a Kiwi business that has understood the power of marketing to create a huge amount of value in a short amount of time.

News
Should Auckland have a creative director?
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Yesterday, at the Auckland War Memorial Museum, the Committee for Auckland announced some of the key findings that have been compiled in its latest report called ‘Auckland as a Creative City’. The principle theme delivered during the breakfast event was that “Auckland needs an over-arching strategy to unlock the potential of its creative sectors and grow the economy to make the city more globally competitive.”

Opinion
What ‘New Auckland’ means for marketers
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Inspired by a conversation with Al Brown on the new-found optimisim surrounding Auckland, James Hurman set out to discover why people were feeling so good about the city. Then, after speaking to 50 leading Aucklanders, he compiled a report that aims to create a shared understanding of ‘New Auckland’. These are some of the main insights.

News
Horse’s Mouth: James Hurman
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After a couple of years as managing director at Y&R NZ, James Hurman has taken the best bits from his life in advertising and started up an innovation consultancy called Previously Unavailable that aims to help Kiwi companies create better products and services. So why did he do it and what will he be doing?

News
Lost in translation
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Back in 1964, sci-fi writer and biochemistry professor Isaac Asimov wrote an article for The New York Times predicting what life might be like in 2014. He got a few things right (although he was off in other areas, but humans do tend to remember the hits and overlook the many misses of futurists and psychics, something often known as the Jeane Dixon effect). And while there’s no doubt we live in a remarkable age, filled with an array of remarkable innovations designed to make our lives easier, we’re still obviously a long way from cracking the audio-to-text puzzle, as this transcript of an interview Vincent Heeringa recently gave to James Hurman that was converted by an automated online service attests.

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