Browsing: Getty Images

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And the VR craze continues
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There’s been another big step towards virtual realty as Getty Images and 360Cities partner to make 360-degree photographs of the moon, and beautiful locations on earth accessible to customers while McDonald’s happy meals gets a VR makeover in Sweden.

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2015 told through Getty’s images
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In 2015, the Getty Images’ editorial team of photographers snapped away at many of the key news stories and events, covering more than 130,000 news, sport and entertainment events at home and around the globe: over 70,000 in entertainment, 30,000 in sport and 30,000 in news. Here’s a collection of some of the most memorable moments.

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Getty Images’ Stuart Hannagan chooses five images that shook the world
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When newspapers published images of two-year-old Aylan Kurdi, drowned, lying facedown, the world was stirred and finally realised—or perhaps remembered—the horror of the Syrian conflict. But this isn’t the first time images have significantly changed public discourse. As the following five images collated by Getty Images’ Stuart Hannagan show, images have time and time again laid bare the uglier side of life. (Warning: this article contains material that may offend some).

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From soccer dad to diaper dad: the changing representation of fathers in the media
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Early next month Kiwis will be celebrating Father’s Day. The one time of the year where dads (if they’re lucky) they will get toast in bed, maybe some chocolate and hopefully a lashing of affection and appreciation from the family. This is also the time when a lot of dad-inclusive advertising comes out, often promoting things like lawn mowers and DIY renovation equipment. But the idea of the dad is changing, and gradually this is being reflected in our advertising. Dad is no longer just into power tools, he also likes staying in and reading books with the kids, cooking and taking on what has traditionally been considered ‘feminine’ roles. Here’s Getty Images’ vice president of creative content’s take on the evolution of the dad and what this shows about our shifting perceptions.

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Times they are a changin’: LGBT-inclusive advertising and its value for marketers
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Advertising can be a bit like a mirror, or perhaps more like the Mirror of Erised (cue cheesy reference) from Harry Potter where an idealised version of ourselves is reflected back at us. When targeted well it can be so pervasive that we come to think of advertising scenarios as being normal “Of course I should be wearing those shoes”, “Clearly I need that marble bench top in my kitchen”. Advertisers try to reflect our relationships too, marketing to couples and families. But wouldn’t it be strange to see advertising bypass us, for us to see ads embodying relationships or representations of people that don’t reflect our reality. For the reported 10 to 15 percent of New Zealanders that make up our LGBT community, it has been like this for a long time. But things are changing, the world is slowly but surely progressing, and so is the advertising world along with it. Here are a few examples of advertising that includes this community, and why it would be of interest for advertisers to continue doing so, particularly in light of gay marriage increasingly becoming legalised in more countries.

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Real, uncut, unedited: the growth of user-generated content
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Approximately 300 hours of video content are uploaded to YouTube every minute—and the vast majority of it is created by regular users who capture personal experiences with Go Pros, smartphones and laptop cameras. So prolific is this trend of user-generated content that millennials are now sometimes referred to as Generation C, for Generation Content.

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Not everything is pink and blue: Getty encourages marketers to go gender neutral
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For decades, pink has been for girls and blue has been for boys. This arbitrary assignation of colour to gender has for generations dictated the colour of children’s rooms, clothes, stationery and toys. And these constraints that omnipotently decide ‘this is for boys’ and ‘this is for girls’ have also extended into other areas of children’s lives, often limiting what they feel they are permitted to participate in. However, these notions that have until now been cast in plasticine GI Joes action figures and Barbie dolls are starting to melt together, blurring gender lines and giving children the ability to determine how they want to represent their personal identities.

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Small cameras, big stories: putting the viewer at the centre of the action
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In the early ’90s, video cameras for personal use were large clunky devices that most often delivered grainy footage to video cassettes that would almost invariably collect dust in a box located in some forgotten corner of the house. But as technology advanced the cameras became smaller and cheaper, and the quality they delivered improved drastically. Nowhere is the this trend more evident than in the story that underpins the rise of Go Pro. The evolution of camera technology has allowed an entire generation to capture footage and share experiences that were once restricted to only the person participating in them.