stoppress.co.nz https://stoppress.co.nz StopPress provides essential industry news and intelligence, updated daily. Mon, 20 Jan 2020 03:16:28 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.3.2 https://i0.wp.com/stoppress.co.nz/wp-content/uploads/2019/08/StopPress-Favicon.png?fit=32%2C32&ssl=1 stoppress.co.nz https://stoppress.co.nz 32 32 9249403 The Stoppies 2019: Group of Humans – YoungShand https://stoppress.co.nz/news/the-stoppies-2019-group-of-humans-youngshand/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=the-stoppies-2019-group-of-humans-youngshand https://stoppress.co.nz/news/the-stoppies-2019-group-of-humans-youngshand/#respond Sun, 19 Jan 2020 22:31:41 +0000 https://stoppress.co.nz/?p=36693 Late last year, StopPress gathered the industry for an evening of self-congratulation as we celebrated the work that made 2019 so great, as well as the moments that got lips moving. YoungShand ended the year receiving the coveted Group of Humans Award. Managing director Duncan Shand looks back on the year that was. What were some [...]

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Late last year, StopPress gathered the industry for an evening of self-congratulation as we celebrated the work that made 2019 so great, as well as the moments that got lips moving. YoungShand ended the year receiving the coveted Group of Humans Award. Managing director Duncan Shand looks back on the year that was.

What were some highlights of 2019?

The highlights were definitely the work. We’ve always had a strong digital foundation but last year was all about combining brave, purposeful brand thinking with our digital expertise to help propel our client’s brands forward.

This came through in our work, from the ‘Quit for your pet’ campaign for Quitline, the NZ Blood Service ‘World’s Biggest Reserve Bench’ and the Blind & Low Vision NZ ‘AltTextForAll’ Movement. Each of these campaigns was grounded in a bold idea and planned across both traditional and digital channels.

NZ Blood Service campaign featuring Graham Henry.

The same integrated digital and brand thinking allowed us to drive more innovative web experiences, including the Alcohol and Me website that we created for Lion, which benefited from a healthy mix of brand and design experience thinking. 

What were the biggest challenges of 2019?

The biggest challenge was keeping up with all the great work. For an agency of our current size (35 people), we developed a heck of a lot of big, integrated campaigns in 2019, but we wouldn’t have it any other way. And being smaller certainly has its benefits, allowing us to be agile and responsive while living our core value of collaboration, both internally and with our client partners. We have a great team who know how to hustle and are committed to bringing our unique way of working to life in everything we do (oops, that was another highlight).

What will we see from YoungShand in the next 12 months? 

We’ve refined our model over the last 12 months. So the next 12 months are all about continuing to build on this foundation, with a commitment to innovation and work that’s unique and stands out from the crowd. 

In addition to this, we’ll also be investing in further strengthening the media and data side of our offering. This will enable us to continue to use data to integrate and personalise communications to more efficiently connect with customers and drive a better ROI for our clients. 

How many hires did you make in 2019?

Seven new people joined our team in 2019. Every hire we make is about increasing our talent pool across the agency, with each one enabling us to better service our existing clients. It is also critical that they are as excited about where the agency is going as we are.

Of those hires, three have created a real shift in the agency. At the beginning of the year, Anne Boothroyd joined Scott Maddox as joint Creative Director. Together, Anne and Scott have lifted the creative and production quality of our work this year. 

At the end of the year, after a long search, we hired Claire Backhouse as our Strategy Director. Claire has returned from the UK with 10+ years agency and client experience across a wide variety of brands. She brings a balanced digital and brand strategy approach to the team. 

Lastly, Nigel Sutton has joined us as Head of Production. Nigel will be integral in driving our integrated 360 production team and has a unique mix of experience that he brings to the table, giving us the right team to bring anything to market. 

How many client wins did you have?

We had three significant client wins in 2019. We picked up the Hellers account for brand and media, Healtheries for digital media and website development, and Oceania Healthcare as a lead brand agency. The ‘Quit for your pets’ campaign for the Health Promotion Agency was also our first campaign after being appointed to the All of Government Panel.

How many champagne bottles were popped, and why? 

There were so many reasons to celebrate – the work, the wins and the new hires. But just as importantly, there were the personal milestones – first houses, parenthood and promotions. 

How many awards were won? 

Last year was all about the work, so this year we hope to see this reflected in a few awards. Our favourite accolade, however, would have to be ‘Group of Humans of the Year’ from the Stoppies. It was recognition of the hard work put in by every member of our team. The global attention our ‘Quit for your pets’ campaign received was also another proud moment.

Biggest hope for YoungShand in 2020?

Our focus is on developing brave, innovative work that moves our client’s businesses forward into the new decade with momentum and purpose. If we can do more of that, we’ll be happy. 

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As broad as your imagination: Fuji Xerox’ Iridesse pushes the boundaries for creatives https://stoppress.co.nz/partner-articles/as-broad-as-your-imagination-fuji-xerox-iridesse-pushes-the-boundaries-for-creatives/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=as-broad-as-your-imagination-fuji-xerox-iridesse-pushes-the-boundaries-for-creatives https://stoppress.co.nz/partner-articles/as-broad-as-your-imagination-fuji-xerox-iridesse-pushes-the-boundaries-for-creatives/#respond Sun, 19 Jan 2020 22:24:36 +0000 https://stoppress.co.nz/?p=36698 At the cutting edge of digital printing is the Iridesse Production Press. At a recent Sunrise Session and Breakfast Workshop, hosted by Fuji Xerox and the Marketing Association, the possibilities for using the press for print embellishments in direct marketing campaigns were showcased. “A game changer.” These were the words of Brenden Rolston, managing director [...]

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At the cutting edge of digital printing is the Iridesse Production Press. At a recent Sunrise Session and Breakfast Workshop, hosted by Fuji Xerox and the Marketing Association, the possibilities for using the press for print embellishments in direct marketing campaigns were showcased.

“A game changer.”

These were the words of Brenden Rolston, managing director of personalised communications marketing agency ActionHQ, to describe Fuji Xerox’ Iridesse Production Press.

Rolston was presenting to a packed out audience of industry professionals at the Marketing Association in Parnell; explaining the possibilities and capabilities of the press for creatives and clients.

The session was opened with an introduction from the Marketing Association’s chief executive Tony Mitchell.

A special invitation pack for the event was sent out six weeks previously, explained Mitchell, with each element in the pack produced on the Iridesse, displaying the unique print embellishments the press is known for.

“It had a whole different feel, a different look,” Mitchell explained. 

“The graphics and print quality had a whole lot of outstanding cut-through.”

For Rolston, he and his team at Action HQ had a Fuji Xerox machine but it was due for renewal last year.

“Fortunate for me, new technology was coming along. I was looking for something that would change the game for our clients,” Rolston says.

And this is what the Iridesse has provided.

Featuring the first six-colour print engine from Fuji Xerox, it is able to print specialty colours, including metallics, with a single pass, by housing up to two additional specialty dry inks of gold, silver, clear and white in addition to the usual cyan, magenta, yellow and black (CMYK).

“Every once in a while a revolutionary product or service comes along that changes everything,” Rolston explained.

“For me, the Iridesse is that machine and the time is now.”

Re-imagining the creative dimensions

One of the key things about this technology, Rolston points out, is that it will “change the way we think about print, digital print in particular, and also it will change the way we create”.

Previously, creatives have been limited to how much they can do in digital print.

With the Iridesse machine, there are stock and paper benefits “you’ve never dreamed you could work with before,” Rolston explained.

To illustrate these incredible possibilities of the Iridesse machine, Rolston showed the audience several examples of client direct marketing work. The samples illustrated the fine detail, texture and glossy metallics the press is capable of producing.

“From a creative perspective if you’ve got really fine gradients or shading, wanting to explore a new spectrum of iridescent colours or embellishment then this is a really interesting technology coming through,” he says.

Depending on your needs, the Iridesse can do small runs – from a unit of one upwards – and has the ‘magpie effect’, drawing the eye with its metallic, shiny gloss. It can also produce books and has a variety of finishing techniques such as inline stitching.

And to illustrate the quality and technology of the Iridesse, Fuji Xerox has produced the entire story of Moby Dick on a single A4 piece of paper which can be read through a magnifying glass. 

Another key point is the ease of the process, Rolston says.

“It’s not complicated. The experiences we can create for people, be it through invitations, print or direct marketing, are also cost-effective from design through to finished piece.”

Stand out from the herd

Several Fuji Xerox clients had samples of their work – from gift boxes to booklets – on display at the Sunrise Session for the audience to take away.

Matt Mills, director of award-winning, multidisciplinary print company Fuzed, says the Iridesse offers clients and creatives points of difference to traditional printing. 

Fuzed has won more New Zealand Pride In Print awards using the Iridesse than any other New Zealand print company.

“It’s being able to achieve results that you could previously only dream about,” says Mills.

“There are still more options available to agencies and designers that haven’t been explored yet, but I can assure you the Iridesse is up for the challenge. It’s so robust and customisable that it becomes another member of your team.”

Diedre Winter, managing director and owner of direct marketing communications company Mailshop, adds that personalisation is another key asset.

“Personalisation that can be highly creative – with metallic inks and white laser printing – is a highly-effective way to cut through to your clients. The opportunity to personalise packaging like we have never seen before is a huge bonus.”

Mailshop’s print samples at the event used metallics on personalised envelopes to show how one can print flat sheet form, with the first thing the customer seeing being the artwork popping off the page, Winter explains.

“What we are showing is dynamic content, interesting stock types, vinyl and personalisation. Imagine a computer digital campaign that can look just as good on paper – we can do that now”.

Having started the journey with the Iridesse in March last year, Janice Page, creative director of design and print company Caxton, says the company had seen what the press could do and was very interested in offering something additional to standard full-colour digital print.

Page says that the aim of the design of Caxton’s sample was to create a complete pack that was fun and useful to designers, and gave them a good idea of what the metallic, white and clear would look like using many different types of stock.

“The pack can sit on a designer’s desk and includes a folder with pen, doodle notepad, coffee coasters and desk calendar”.

Power to be harnessed

Another benefit of the Iridresse is the incredible resources Fuji Xerox have included, such as a whole new palate of different colours. These colours have been patented due to their iridescent effect, and designers and creatives can upload them to their design files for free.

The Iridesse is also pre-set up with more than 60 specified Pantone colours. It can print up to 1.2m long (which is able to be personalised), has a 330mm width maximum and a speed of 120 pages per minute.

Future focussed

With only imagination holding you back, the Iridesse Production Press offers clients and creatives alike the ability to create memorable, personalised direct marketing campaigns that people can see, touch and experience.

Contact: gcs.marketing@fujixerox.co.nz

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Year in Review: Cassie Roma, The Warehouse Group https://stoppress.co.nz/news/year-in-review-cassie-roma-the-warehouse-group/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=year-in-review-cassie-roma-the-warehouse-group https://stoppress.co.nz/news/year-in-review-cassie-roma-the-warehouse-group/#respond Sun, 19 Jan 2020 21:00:00 +0000 https://stoppress.co.nz/?p=36517 Every year, StopPress asks players in the local industry for their reflections on the marketing year that was. Here’s what Cassie Roma, head of content marketing at The Warehouse Group, had to say. 1. Favourite campaign This year has been quite a rollicking ride for all of us in AdLand hasn’t it? Whilst there has been [...]

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Every year, StopPress asks players in the local industry for their reflections on the marketing year that was. Here’s what Cassie Roma, head of content marketing at The Warehouse Group, had to say.

1. Favourite campaign

This year has been quite a rollicking ride for all of us in AdLand hasn’t it? Whilst there has been a lot of cool, fun, and impactful work done in traditional arenas (ahem, TV) my two favourite campaigns of the year have been ones that’ve been activated beyond television.

For me, Starship’s Air Ambulance and Kiwibank’s I Am Hope campaigns stood apart from the rest because both helped to raise necessary awareness and funds for those in our society who need our help most.

I’m a wee bit biased when it comes to the Starship campaign (my wife really helped to bring it to life beautifully while she was working with the team there.) The heroes of the campaign were kids who survived against all odds – every last story tugged at my heartstrings. As an added bonus the musical track for the campaign’s anthem video was a song by my fave songbird and beautiful mate, Anika Moa.

Switching gears from Starship to a bank! This year Kiwibank’s I Am Hope brought the nation together to talk about and stand up for mental health and delivered all the happy feels to my sappy Cancerian heart. Moving beyond a simple iteration of a brand-centric campaign, Kiwibank leaned into partnering with Mike King and his strong, authentic voice to help create waves of action around #gumbootfriday and having necessary conversations about mental health.

Both of these campaigns stick out for me. They were both driven by a desire to do good by others. Isn’t it amazing how activating simple, yet powerful, conversations can shape the course of a narrative for a brand and a society?

This year, Kiwibank and The Starship Foundation helped all of us to put our money where our hearts are.

2. Favourite campaign that is yours

This year was a year-for-good when it came to being a part of activating some of the amazing work that was done at The Warehouse Group around being #HereForGood.

We sure have accomplished a lot as a group in a single trip around the sun! From becoming the 3rd large retailer in the world to go Carbon Neutral early in the year, to reinstating soft-plastic recycling in our Warehouse Stores, to promoting literacy for kids and ensuring thousands of kids get something special under the Xmas Tree this Silly Season, I’ve absolutely loved being a part of the #HereForGood journey at TWG in 2019.

3. Favourite international campaign 

For me, 2019 was the year of #empoweringwomen. In that vein, I loved anything and everything by Wildfang. If I could dream up a brand that is equal parts activism, kick ass products, and strong purpose-driven marketing, then it’d be Wildfang.

This year alone the brand took on issues such as Period Poverty, patriarchy, and championing small businesses during Black Friday (F*ck the mall, shop small).

With clever and impactful campaigns like “A Lady Should”, their “Wolf Pack” partnership with Abby Wambach and their strong push against apathetic world leaders “I really care, don’t you?” – they won my heart, drained my wallet, and filled my closet with amazing duds.

The humans who bring Wildfang to life literally gave me life this year when it comes to marketing, branding, building a followership around contextual cultural moments, and being unapologetically queer/female/activist/badass.

Honourable mentions for AMAZING international campaigns go to:

4. Least favourite campaign

I am a perennial optimist and think this year was a good year for advertising, so I might simply leave this link here and say that, for me, it missed every mark possible: Behold, the Goop Xmas ad – lol, but not.

5. Your own biggest success 

2019 was a year of blossoming for me. Better late than never, right? Sharing my voice instead of fearing it, stepping into my own sense of self, and injecting kindness into every single day (without fear of being painted as anything other than strong and able) is how I’d sum up my successes this year.

The cherry on top of it all was, of course, being recognised as Sage of The Year in front of some of my favourite humans in the world – my peers.

Yee haw, roll on 2020!

6. Most significant launch/innovation/thing of the year 

For me, it’s the Nike Hijab swimsuit. We live in a world where we’re inundated with terminology around diversity and inclusion, but very few brands actually live this ethos. Nike, regardless of how anyone sees them politically, leans waaaaaaay into the doing part when it comes to putting their money and their products where their activism is. For that, I salute them.

What should be un-invented?

One-size-fits all templates for pushing beige and banal ads at people.
We’re creatives! Let’s be, erm… creative.

In 2020 I’d love for the entire industry world-wide to harken back to the pioneering spirit that made us who we are when it comes to storytelling and suspension of disbelief. Human communication isn’t singular in approach for all contexts, why should we spend our advertising dollars like it is?

7. Lamest trend 

Denouncing new channels like TikTok (1 billion + humans on the platform is credence enough) because you don’t understand them. And, in the same vein, attempting to demystify Gen Z. We don’t need crystal balls to understand an entire generation of young people, we have data for that.

The beauty of understanding new platforms is that you don’t have to be a digital-native to understand new channels, you need only to act like/become a local. Immerse yourself, follow your curiosity when it comes to new platforms and enjoy the learning curve! If you do, you’ll be well ahead of the game.   

8. Best brands 

I’m one of those weird humans who loves to love brands (must be the American in me!) so here are my faves right now:

  • Wildfang (Yasssss!)
  • Nike (fight me)
  • Patagonia
  • IKEA
  • Kiwibank

9. Best stoush 

Facebook vs The World.

It’s been quite a year for The Zuck and his big blue brand. After the events of March 15th in Christchurch, the pressure on Facebook to ensure nothing like it never happened again was (and remains) huge.

I can only imagine 2020 will be another monster year for Facebook with the US Presidential Elections looming in November. Here’s hoping all of the big social media platforms work their butts off to ensure we’re not all duped by bad actors and timelines that we’re addicted to scrolling through. I for one will be watching very, very closely across all of the main players in the digital and social media sphere.

10. Heroes 

These gals, and this guy, are my heroes:

Emma McIlroy:
Emma’s someone I look up to for a lot of reasons. Firstly, she’s a bad-ass through and through. She’s also a CEO with grit, guts, heart, truthfulness and the ability to laugh at herself and the world around her. Emma’s a cool cat.
There’s always space at the table for her and women like her.
Lead on, leader!

Lizzo:
Lizzo’s changed the entire world and stopped it on its axis a few times over the past 365 sleeps. She’s a force of nature who not only performs, but protests as well, every time she takes the stage or enters a room.
May we all be more like Lizzo in 2020.

Greta:
When I was Greta’s age I was worried about whether or not there’d be crinkle-cut fries or chunky chips at the softball field on a Friday night.
Right now, Greta’s saving the world.
She’s making OUR world a better place for everyone now and in the future.
Status: HERO.

Jacinda Ardern:
The last time I spoke to Jacinda Ardern was a few years back, at the front of the Auckland Pride Parade as the procession was beginning. She was PM, pregnant and marching alongside all of us in our rainbow glory.

I was, as always, as awkward as hell and instead of saying something even slightly intelligent I complimented her on her Allbirds. Yes, folks. Her shoes. Footwear that keeps your feet cool when it’s warm out, and keeps them warm when it’s cool out. Gah. Shame. WHAT A NERD.

Anyhow, the next time I speak to Jacinda I hope the words that come out of my mouth are simply “Thank you.” The PM’s leadership this year has been monumentally empathetic, kind, and unwavering. For all of these reasons and more, she is a hero of mine in 2019.

Malcolm Gladwell:
One of the highlights of my year was when Malcolm responded to a Tweet of mine about Taco Bell. Yep, a big old BRIGHT highlight.

Why? The man is one of the only storytellers alive that grabs me by the imagination and the heart every time I hear him speak or read something he’s written.

Malcolm’s way of seeing the world helps me unpack my own views.

This my friends, is magic.

11. Villains 

There are a few villains out there, mostly though I’ll give mention to the fast-food loving orange dude with a fast-Twitter finger living in The White House. He’s so yuck.

Special mentions include Weinstein, Epstein, Prince Andrew and people of their ilk – (AKA privileged men who hurt others for their perverse pleasures.) 

And, looking ahead, any and all “bad actors” who will most likely be mucking around in the elections of 2020.

12. What died in 2019? 

My ability to stay quiet when I see injustice, overt meanness, or plain old rudeness. For a long time I toed invisible lines of tradition and feared speaking out against those with louder voices or bigger titles. Nah, not anymore.

We’ve all spent far too long being nice to people who aren’t nice back. So, in 2019, I spoke up. I called people out on inappropriate behaviour. And I started to trust my instincts instead of push them away.

Wow! What a liberating move it is stepping into our own potency.

I can highly recommend doing so to any and all of us.

Kindness isn’t meek.
It’s clarity and it’s confidence.
I wish for this type of liberation for everyone in 2020.  

13. What’s the biggest mistake marketers will make in 2020? 

Taking themselves too seriously and not thinking beyond their wee sliver of the world.

It’s so important to look up and outside of your own product and brand and silo to truly see and understand the world around us.

I love it when my colleagues get super-duper curious about humanity, culture, activism and sustainability – then apply it to their professional lives in any way they can!

When you care about the world around you and truly love humanity (we’re such fun, quirky, and nuanced beings!), it shows in your work. When you’re only after awards that sit and gather dust on mantlepieces and all the while forget about the true power of putting great communications into the world, that also shows in your work.

Let’s all have a bit of fun and do good shit together in 2020!

14. If there were no laws for 24 hours, what would you do?

Eek! I’ve always been a good little global citizen so the thought of 24 hours of lawlessness scare the $hit out of me! If the no laws rule applied to EVERYONE, I’d find a safe place with my family to hunker down for a day and simply enjoy each other whilst the world enjoyed bigger moment of manic frenzy than usual.

If it was only me who had no laws to abide to I’d probably be boring and live exactly the same way as I already do. Not to say I’m lawless or pay no heed to the rules of society right now, but I’m a free-spirit who wheels and deals in kindness.

So, laws are okay with me – especially the ones we can bend a bit when the need arises.

Year in Review is brought to you by oOh!media.

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A student take: AUT students tackle street harassment – part one https://stoppress.co.nz/news/a-student-take-aut-students-tackle-street-harassment/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=a-student-take-aut-students-tackle-street-harassment https://stoppress.co.nz/news/a-student-take-aut-students-tackle-street-harassment/#respond Thu, 16 Jan 2020 22:07:09 +0000 https://stoppress.co.nz/?p=36669 Last year, Women in Urbanism Aotearoa took our streets to social media in an enlightening Stop Street Harassment campaign. To help spread the word, the group called in the help of AUT advertising students to create their own version of the campaign. Here, Reuben Brooks and Grace Mitchell share their creation and thoughts on the [...]

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Last year, Women in Urbanism Aotearoa took our streets to social media in an enlightening Stop Street Harassment campaign. To help spread the word, the group called in the help of AUT advertising students to create their own version of the campaign. Here, Reuben Brooks and Grace Mitchell share their creation and thoughts on the advertising industry.

The creative brief tasked students with solving the problem of street or public harassment.

  • Read our interview with Emma McInnes, co-founder of Women in Urbanism Aotearoa and a designer at MRCagency, about the group and its campaign here.

The desired outcome was to report incidences of harassment to the Human Rights Commission, while getting people talking about it, validating women’s stories of it, and empowering the public to intervein when they see it happening.

The campaign was to include visuals and copy as well as a rationale for platforms.

Below, the creative duo of Reuben Brooks and Grace Mitchell and share their response to the brief.

Reuben Brooks and Grace Mitchell

What sparked your interest in getting into the industry?

Brooks
I liked writing in school so it was either gonna be journalism or advertising for me. I ended up finding journalism really boring. I decided I wanted to make ads after our very first tutorial. Then I watched the episode of Mad Men where Don pitches to Lucky Strike and that sealed the deal.

Mitchell
I’ve always been intrigued in storytelling whether through film, a short docu-series or a punchline. Advertising stood out because it was a challenge to engage an audience who don’t have much time to spare and who you’re already starting off on the backfoot with. I like a challenge.

Reuben Brooks and Grace Mitchell’s response to the brief.

From what you have seen and learned so far through study and work experience, has the industry been what you thought it would be?

Brooks
It’s so much more than coming up with good headlines or a good script. The industry’s looking for people who can create ideas that are bigger than print or TV. But at the same time, the fundamentals will always be the same—to talk to people and get them to do something.

Mitchell
Yes and No. There are always going to be two sides to every industry and I’m not well versed in the area so I can’t truly speak on it. But there is some incredible talent who are striving to turn the ad world around and that’s what I want to be a part of.

What were your first thoughts when you received the brief for the Street Harassment campaign for Women in Urbanism?

Brooks
My first thought was that it was way beyond our capabilities. It’s a significant problem and I didn’t know if we would be able to give it the right treatment. We were dealing with human lives instead of products and services.

Mitchell
Honestly, a reel of failed attempts of social campaigns flashed through my head. With such important subject matter, the responsibility is even bigger to ensure you can actually deliver a captivating campaign while still handling it sensitively. Reuben and I wanted to avoid the usual guilt-tripping that comes with this genre of ads and instead have people thinking and acting on the ad long after they’d seen it.

How did you feel working with real stories from women who have experienced harassment?

Brooks
It was a scary brief because it was the first time we were dealing with real-life situations that have huge impacts on people’s lives. But it was also exciting because it’s not often you have the opportunity to make a positive difference rather than just selling shit to people.

Mitchell
It was sad, there’s no other way to say it. The ages that women had experienced it from were most alarming but not as alarming as the tenacity of the perpetrators.

Sexual harassment is not something everyone has experienced, so where do you go to get an understanding of it if you haven’t experienced it for yourself?

Brooks
Hearing people’s stories was definitely an eye-opener. Some people are just gross. But in order to really understand the problem we tried to get into the mindset of abusers and figure out what makes them do awful stuff on public transport, so they would hear us and actually change their behaviour.

Mitchell 
It sucks but subtle sexual harassment can happen on a daily basis for most women, and I’ve definitely experienced my fair share. To the point where you stop recognising it as sexual harassment because it starts to blend in with the everyday. That mindset is what we tried to capture in our campaign because women need to be reminded that things like guys pressing on you on the bus, or licking their lips and making lewd remarks is not okay.

Can you explain the idea behind the campaign you two created?

Brooks
In short, the idea is that unwanted attention is not romantic. It starts from the perspective of the perpetrator—they think there’s nothing wrong with what they’re doing, even thinking their behaviour is flattering. Then the whole thing is flipped upside down where we find out how grossed out and unsafe the victim feels.

Mitchell 
We wanted our words to be our weapon in this campaign so that we could focus on the impact left behind to the audience. We chose the style of a romantic novel to pull people in on the thought of ‘oh great another blah ad’ but then kick them in the gut with the following line. Not all romantic stories have a happy ending, nor are they always romantic to both parties involved.

As a creative, do you see your role as being one that can spark change in the world?

Brooks
For sure. In today’s climate, it’s so much easier to be viral. To be able to harness the globalisation of media can be so powerful. People bombard themselves with information all day, so to have the ability to cut through the noise is invaluable.

Mitchell
YES. Creating that one ad out of the dozens of people see in a day and actually making them laugh or truly think is something worth chasing. The best ads have probably been behind the creation of some big moves in this world. The 1943 ‘We can do it’ ad by J. Howard Miller is still having its say to this day, but would a President ever admit to an ad being behind his latest bill?

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The compendium: January 17 https://stoppress.co.nz/poppress/the-compendium-january-17/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=the-compendium-january-17 https://stoppress.co.nz/poppress/the-compendium-january-17/#respond Thu, 16 Jan 2020 21:47:47 +0000 https://stoppress.co.nz/?p=36670 I would definitely slam a plate into someone’s face for the last of any meal and Taco Bell does a great job in this ad of proving the lengths we will go to. This ad is the definition of 0-100 real quick. I’m including this ad solely for my extreme dislike of it for these [...]

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I would definitely slam a plate into someone’s face for the last of any meal and Taco Bell does a great job in this ad of proving the lengths we will go to. This ad is the definition of 0-100 real quick.

I’m including this ad solely for my extreme dislike of it for these reasons. 1) ‘New Year new me’ says the woman with zero percent body fat and rock hard abs. 2) The loose correlation between the ad being for the Superbowl, “Go sports” she yells. 3) The awkward end jogging on a treadmill going 2 miles per hour.

A fantastic meta ad promoting deodorant for people that respect women. If I see one more perfectly hairless naked woman promoting a razor I will point the creatives to this ad.

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Year in Review: Rhys Heron, Mi9 https://stoppress.co.nz/news/year-in-review-rhys-heron-mi9/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=year-in-review-rhys-heron-mi9 https://stoppress.co.nz/news/year-in-review-rhys-heron-mi9/#respond Thu, 16 Jan 2020 21:00:00 +0000 https://stoppress.co.nz/?p=36512 Every year, StopPress asks players in the local industry for their reflections on the marketing year that was. Here’s what Rhys Heron, managing director of Mi9, had to say. 1. Favourite local campaign that isn’t yours Whether you buy into the premise or not, the Lotto ‘Imagine’ television commercial was an engaging and ultimately memorable [...]

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Every year, StopPress asks players in the local industry for their reflections on the marketing year that was. Here’s what Rhys Heron, managing director of Mi9, had to say.

1. Favourite local campaign that isn’t yours

Whether you buy into the premise or not, the Lotto ‘Imagine’ television commercial was an engaging and ultimately memorable piece of storytelling. I remember it sparking conversations in the living room and office.

2. Favourite campaign that is yours

We ran a Native campaign of five articles for James Hardie via PHD on MSN NZ that we’re proud of. It was true editorial Native featuring compelling storytelling and high-quality imagery. The articles wouldn’t have been out of place in a high-end home design or architectural publication.

3. Favourite international campaign 

I’m a bit of a stationery fan; who doesn’t like coloured pens, highlighters and post-it notes? With that in mind I thought the Staedtler ‘To the Point’ highlighter campaign by Leo Burnett Hong Kong was clever, highlighting that in a world overflowing with information the actual gem can be found in the detail by cutting through the noise and getting to the point! Awareness of Staedtler highlighters also rose to 20% in the wake of the campaign.

4. Least favourite campaign 

Vaping companies deliberately targeting teenaged users in other markets seems to have received the negative attention it deserved.

5. Your own biggest success 

Mi9 NZ is enjoying a strong 2019, facilitated by clear purpose and strategy, a capable and cohesive team, and incremental product and service innovation that is resonating with our clients. Our customer focus, transparency and authenticity is also appreciated. I’m excited to see what we can achieve in 2020!

6. Most significant launch/innovation/thing of the year 

We combined our Microsoft first-party data from 2.1 million accounts, Experian socio-economic data, and Grapeshot contextual targeting into Macro Segment Data of 18 custom segments that our clients can apply across our network of MSN NZ, Outlook.com, Dailymotion, MTV and Comedy Central. The segments were developed using latent demand and insights from the market and have proved popular with our clients seeking specific audiences at scale.

7. What should be un-invented? 

Is it too late to uninvent Crocs?

8. Lamest trend 

I’m not sure it’s a trend (yet) but I’ve never agreed with wearing socks with sandals. It’s summer so we need to be vigilant.

Work it

9. Best brands 

Disney has really put itself on the map and back in my consciousness this year with a stellar run of movie releases, including six of the eight most successful movies of 2019 so far, and breaking the $10 billion global box office barrier in the process. Disney’s CEO, Bob Iger, was announced TIME’s businessperson of the year so I was interested to learn more about his strategy and career recently.

10. Best stoush 

The fight between U.S. beer brands Bud Lite and Miller and Coors Lite over the use of the ingredient corn syrup in the latter that started during Super Bowl advertising was pretty epic and seemed to gather a life of its own, continuing from February until late 2019, including in court. It’s also been held up in advertising commentary as an example of brands prioritising listening to each other more than their customers so may not be an example for local brand rivals to emulate!

11. Heroes 

The Mandalorian.

12. Villains 

There are many but I think Donald Trump has done more than most to debase the presidency of the United States and the credibility of democratically elected leadership in general, including trolling a child, Greta Thunberg, on social media because she holds views he disagrees with. I grew up expecting a lot more from democratically elected politicians than that. Luckily New Zealand has avoided the worst of these trends to now.

13. What died in 2019?

Civic discourse on social media is definitely on life support. You don’t have to look far in any social media or publisher’s comments section to find a huge amount of vitriol, usually from people using anonymous accounts. I think the rule of thumb should be, would you feel brave enough to say this to someone’s face? Social media is such a beneficial platform for sharing information I’d hate to see it overcome by trolling. 

14. What’s the biggest mistake marketers will make in 2020?

Not ensuring there’s sufficient breadth in their media plan to ensure local publishers, who create local content and fund local journalism, are supported. There isn’t massive scale in the New Zealand market so it’s important to protect the diversity we do have.

15: If there were no laws for 24 hours, what would you do? (besides hide)

Does hunkering down and protecting my family during 24 hours of anarchy count as not hiding?

Year in Review is brought to you by oOh!media.

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Amplifying voices: How Women in Urbanism Aotearoa got women speaking out about harassment https://stoppress.co.nz/features/amplifying-voices-how-women-in-urbanism-aotearoa-got-women-speaking-out-about-harassment/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=amplifying-voices-how-women-in-urbanism-aotearoa-got-women-speaking-out-about-harassment https://stoppress.co.nz/features/amplifying-voices-how-women-in-urbanism-aotearoa-got-women-speaking-out-about-harassment/#respond Thu, 16 Jan 2020 02:00:00 +0000 https://stoppress.co.nz/?p=36631 Last year, Women in Urbanism Aotearoa took our streets to social media in an enlightening Stop Street Harassment campaign. Following some time in the public eye, Erin McKenzie sat down with Emma McInnes co-founder of Women in Urbanism Aotearoa and a designer at MRCagency, to talk about the purpose of the campaign and reflect on [...]

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Last year, Women in Urbanism Aotearoa took our streets to social media in an enlightening Stop Street Harassment campaign. Following some time in the public eye, Erin McKenzie sat down with Emma McInnes co-founder of Women in Urbanism Aotearoa and a designer at MRCagency, to talk about the purpose of the campaign and reflect on the realities of unearthing personal stories for it.

Stories of catcalling, groping, stalking and public masturbation were last year shared across social media as Women in Urbanism Aotearoa shed light on real-life experiences of women in a touching and shocking campaign.

Women in Urbanism Aotearoa is an advocacy group to make towns and cities inclusive for everyone with its principles touching on a number of topics from creating spaces that are receptive to the interests of all. Areas of focus include the design of public spaces to have resilience in the face of climate change.

Bringing that vision to life is a team of 20 who dedicate time to it outside of their full-time work.

Emma McInnes, co-founder of the group and a designer at MRCagency, says it was founded three years ago as a networking group for women in the urban design industries, the idea being that the more women there are in architecture, engineering and planning, then the more needs for women will be considered.

“They will be putting in pram ramps for the mums who have prams, they’ll be taking out cobblestones for the women who want to walk around in heels.”

But it’s not just tackling inclusion from a functionality perspective. The group is also an advocate for safety in public places and its recent Stop Street Harassment campaign realises that hope of giving women the freedom to use public transport and places safely.

A survey by Women in Urbanism Aotearoa early in 2019 saw 74 percent of respondents report experiencing harassment while using transport, footpaths and cycleways.

The campaign hopes to support women, by validating what they are feeling while also educating people about what is considered harassment so bystanders will feel encouraged to intervene. Because while it may not look threatening to an outsider, McInnes says women who are being harassed often feel like the situation will escalate into violence.

“Even though some consider catcalling is harmless flattery, a lot of women think they are going to get punched, or the person will run after them,” McInnes says.

Unearthing the stories

To make people stop and think about this, the Stop Street Harassment campaign features a series of illustrations, each paired with a woman’s story and shared on social media.

Though a simple idea, it tackles a complex topic and McInnes says great care was taken when putting together the survey asking for women to open up.

The survey ensured anonymity for those who shared their stories and explained the purpose of the campaign and what the amplification of voices could achieve.

The resulting request drew in hundreds of submissions with stories ranging from catcalling to public masturbation before the survey was closed.

McInnes and the team were overwhelmed by stories and though they validated the need for the campaign, she was wary of promising people their story would be shared but then not have the time and resources to do so.

But it wasn’t just the task of receiving so many stories for McInnes that has touched her. She says the graphic nature of some of the stories had an emotional impact on her.

“I get really sick when I read the stories,” she says.

“It really panicked me to be honest and I thought ‘these women actually need support’.”

The experience has been a big learning for McInnes as she’s learned how to be there with the appropriate level of support and knowing when professional help is needed.

“It’s a complex issue and needs to be dealt with in a lot of sensitivity to make sure people feel heard and seen and supported,” she says. “But without actually being an expert in psychology, you need to know when it’s time to hand over to an expert.”

Given the nature of the campaign, she was also worried about how it would be received up by the public but says it been good and any shock it’s caused has been productive.

“It is shocking and I worried people thought the campaign should be taken down because it’s too shocking. Then I would get feedback saying ‘no it’s just shocking because we didn’t know this happened’.”

The feedback did, however, include some requests to stop the stories about public masturbation but the reality was, those were the common stories being told by the women.

“We had to share those stories because that’s what women were telling us,” McInnes says.

Lessons for all

As well as being a learning experience for McInnes, AUT advertising students were also given the opportunity to create their own take on the campaign.

McInnes shared the brief with the school and was “overwhelmed by how amazing their work was”.

“I feel that since I was at university, the level of creativity has far surpassed what we ever did.”

She also saw how the campaign opened the student’s eyes up to harassment, as female students got talking among themselves while the males raised the topic with their female flatmates and girlfriends to learn more.

The way in which the students took to making their campaigns genuine reflects the way those who have seen it tell McInnes they feel a real connection with it.

“It’s not pushing someone to buy something, it’s pushing them to know where they can go for help or pushing others to help others,” she says.

“So it’s very wholesome in that regard while also telling stories that are hard for people to hear sometimes.”

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The Future of Audio Technology https://stoppress.co.nz/partner-articles/the-future-of-audio-technology/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=the-future-of-audio-technology https://stoppress.co.nz/partner-articles/the-future-of-audio-technology/#respond Thu, 16 Jan 2020 01:30:00 +0000 https://stoppress.co.nz/?p=36648 Advancements in technology have signaled trouble for radio and its historical roots, yet time and time again radio has shown its adaptability to new ways of consumer consumption. As our listening habits change alongside changing technology, audio platforms have found new innovative ways to stay relevant. According to the 2019 Australian survey, The Infinite Dial, [...]

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Advancements in technology have signaled trouble for radio and its historical roots, yet time and time again radio has shown its adaptability to new ways of consumer consumption. As our listening habits change alongside changing technology, audio platforms have found new innovative ways to stay relevant.

According to the 2019 Australian survey, The Infinite Dial, media consumption of audio is continuing to grow. Both music streaming and podcast listening has seen substantial year-on-year growth. Growth of these platforms has heralded the apparent decline of radio in the media, yet results show something different. As technology becomes further advanced, personalised and on demand, radio audio listening is positioned to tackle changes in consumer media consumption.

“Audio listening has always adapted to the times, and that’s one of its main benefits,” says James Cridland, radio futurologist.

Cridland has been within the audio industry for over three decades, and through his time has seen many different adaptions of audio listening as technologies advance. Yet Cridland says one of the best draw cards media such as radio has for maintaining in audiences’ lives is the pure habit of listening that is ingrained in our culture.

“Radio has got something going for it that nothing else does; the habit of tuning in. We’ve certainly seen that when we’ve tried to launch new ideas, that the habit is something that makes change quite slow.”

Cridland sees radio’s longevity surviving through habitual listening, he notes the importance that technology will have on the way it is produced and consumed.

“Now that technology surrounding radio is advancing, things such as the connected home, voice activation, and the connected car make it easier to access radio, not bypass it as an option.”

Listening to change

Cridland says podcasts and music streaming services such as Spotify, which also includes podcasts on its platform, have the most sway over audio listening trends as both have seen increased growth in both Australia and New Zealand. According to the Infinite Dial survey, weekly listening to online audio streaming services has seen an eight percent increase in weekly listening from 2018-2019. 

“Radio has a great opportunity to succeed when it comes to on-demand listening and specifically podcasts,” says Cridland. “If you look at the top-rated podcasts, most likely they’ll include a lot of broadcasting studios and radio personalities.”

James Cridland

“Having said that, podcast listening is so much smaller than radio,” notes Cridland. “In Australia, podcasts are responsible for four percent of the audio we listen to. Whereas broadcast radio is about 65 percent… It’s worthwhile not running away with the idea that podcasting is a major threat. Yet in saying, that it’s clearly an important part of the future of audio consumption, and we shouldn’t forget that.”

Podcasts specifically have gained a lot of traction, with the survey showing over 25 percent of people surveyed listen to four or five podcasts a week, and 19 percent listening to six to ten per week.

Leon Wratt, group content director of radio for MediaWorks, says radio is keeping up well with the demand for podcasts yet acknowledges that they are a different medium than live broadcasting and must be treated as such.

“The real difference here is that we’ve tended to create radio for live audience environments, so the medium that we provide for is very different from podcasts. Broadcasters are taking time to make sure that they are going to create products that are going to work, that is going to suit that environment.”

Wratt says podcasts open more possibilities for audio and broadcasters, but only if the content is created well and delivered effectively. He says for MediaWorks, the transition into podcasting has been a learning curve, yet one that has paid off for wider opportunities in sponsorship.

Leon Wratt

“Advertisers will associate different to a podcast that they will with a radio channel. Podcasts are a very personal thing, so, therefore, the advertiser is more likely to be wary of the environment that they’re going into, more so than they are with a radio environment… We are seeing more branded content type audio listening. It’s a real difference but it’s a real opportunity at the same time, then we can create content specifically for advertisers. Now we can work with a whole bunch of new formats that we couldn’t before.”

Wratt admits that podcasting is a part of audio technology’s future, and at MediaWorks, a focus has been on learning how to properly implement the new medium into existing processes.

“We’re so set up to do live broadcast it can be difficult to shift yourself into a different headspace…That’s what we’re doing now, just working on a different way to approach it, and just making sure everything is prepared.”

Technology raises the stakes

Despite the constant shifting to meet new ways of consumption and demand, Wratt says the opportunities new technology brings will take more adjustment in the first learning stages.

“These new technologies have created a lot of opportunities, but we are content creators first and foremost. These incoming technologies are just a big blank piece of paper, and so you can create anything. However, that also brings in a big challenge, because now we’ve got to write our own rules.”

According to Cridland, podcasting opens up new possibilities for sponsorship. He says broadcasting stations great personalities and access to audiences are a big drawcard for new advertisers who want to align with podcasts.

“Radio’s producing great podcasts using their on-air talent, but they are doing things you could never do on the air. Through that, they have new commercial channels that can get involved with those podcasts, that couldn’t always get involved with direct live radio.”

Audio technology melds easily to social media and online on-demand platforms that are growing in popularity. Wratt says technology and consumer demand are the biggest movers for change in the audio industry, yet instead of a hindrance, “we can produce much more interesting content because technology offers more opportunities.”

Paul Spain, CEO of Gorilla Technologies and host of NZ Tech Podcast, says podcasting is growing in relevance for the future of audio, and broadcasting studios must cater to this growing change in consumption.

“The relevance of podcasting is much broader than we’ve ever seen in audio in the past. From a consumer point of view, it was a very ‘turn on the radio and listen to what you’re given’, now listeners can be much more involved in what they’re consuming”

Paul Spain

From his point of view, love for audio media comes from our ability to listen to it while performing other tasks, unlike when consuming social media or video.

“A huge amount of audio is consumed when people are doing other things. People are able to commit a lot more time to this audio than they might be able to commit to watching video content or reading.”

According to The Infinite Dial survey, 82 percent of podcast listeners listen while at home, 43 percent listen while in the car, and 18 percent while walking.

“What we’re seeing is an increase of listeners’ time going towards podcasts. Having no imagery to audio your mind fills in a lot of the blanks, which makes it a lot more relevant to the listener.”

Spain says the barriers for podcasting are very low, yet stations have the upper hand in terms of quality and knowing their demographic.

“Radio broadcasters know how to create content and they understand audiences within the niches they already hit. They are very capable of creating podcasts. They’ve got a great channel to promote content, and they’ll also have these celebrity type personalities to help launch content which can also help with success.”

He sees new technologies forcing a change in radio over time, with current introductions of the connected car, voice activation and the arrival of 5G as already on the radar.

“Where I see things going is a real melding of technology that we see today. We have voice assistance, we have a level of artificial intelligence, we have mobile networks and a mass connection. I guess what I imagine the future is, we will be able to hop into any autonomous car, maybe it’s self-owned or shared, but I can sit inside that vehicle and the system will interact with my own profile, and play what it knows I want to listen to from machine learning.”

He sees future technology becoming even more customisable and personalised to user experience.

“Technology will keep evolving, and we can only imagine how things will be different in the future. But delivering audio content is quite easy to do, and in the context of targeting people who are connected to an audio source, such as a car, it is very easy to personalise your targets.

Yet New Zealanders’ are often quick to adapt to new technologies in the way we want to consume them, which Kate Burleigh, head of Alexa Skills ANZ at Amazon, says is a great benefit for our audio industry with the example of Amazon’s voice activation service Alexa, which launched last year.

“We have noticed that the usage of Alexa is already at a similar rate that we see in markets where Alexa has been around for much longer. I’m not surprised by this as I’ve known for a long time that New Zealanders are fast adopters of new technology and Alexa seems to be another good example of this.”

She says voice activation technology will help sculpt audio technology as a whole.

Kate Burleigh

“Alexa will get smarter on your device with no new purchases or software updates. We leverage advanced techniques to ensure Alexa keeps getting smarter over time… Like Star Trek, our journey continues. We’ve made great strides, but it’s still early days. As we like to say at Amazon, it’s still day one.”

“One of the biggest benefits we’ve heard from customers around the world is they love Alexa not just because it is much easier to simply ask for your favourite radio station and it plays, but also because they are listening now to radio in their house on a good quality speaker.  The radio industry works so hard to product good sound quality, it’s great the people are able to listen on smart speakers such as the Echo.”

Burleigh highlights the connection that voice activation services like Alexa have to the growth of personalisation and customisation in technology.

“One-way customers can build a personalized experience via Alexa is through Flash Briefing. Skills created by media outlets allow the customer to build a “Flash Briefing” – a personalized news feed: the customer chooses which news stations they like to listen to and create their own Flash Briefing news feeds.”

Human connection

Dean Buchanan, NZME’s group director of entertainment, agrees that audios future leans heavily towards personalisation and on-demand listening, but notes the challenges that may come with uncharted territory, such as podcasting still is for the New Zealand media.

“Right now, there is a big demand from the audiences for more audio,” says Buchanan. “Radio has been clever and has worked new trends into its ecosystem. The growth of podcasts is a natural next step for radio broadcasters… But as always, the rules are made by the audience, if they find it compelling and engaging, they’ll stay.”

Buchanan says radio’s longevity is not just from being adaptable and agrees with Cridland that habitual listening is a strong part of its momentum. Yet he notes being both adaptable and habitual only comes from the approval of listeners.

Dean Buchanan

“Media businesses are only run by audiences. You’re either able to attract the audience to monetise, or you don’t. We have to be where the audience is, so following behaviors, and in our instance getting out in front of behaviors. Being on devices that they’re using, in forms of content they’re ingesting, is what we’re all about.”

Buchanan acknowledges that changes in audio technology are creating an environment that is very much run by our devices. Yet he highlights the importance that will always centre around the content that is put out to the audiences, rather than how they’re ingesting it.

“If you look at the history of successful radio, radio today, and the radio of the future, it will be centered around great New Zealanders making great content.”

“The industry plays such an intrinsic part in Kiwis everyday lifestyle. The more the world becomes global, the more important your local New Zealand voice becomes.”

Besides being free, easily accessible and hard to disrupt in times of chaos, Buchanan says radio listeners trust the medium to deliver quality truthful content in a growing time of fake news and our own national tragedies. 

“The example I would use is the Christchurch shootings. People turned straight to radio. Our news stations were detailing through those awful first hours, and our music stations were sending people directly to Newstalk ZB. What we said to our music stations at the time was ‘don’t speculate, don’t go to air with rumors, let the journalists do their job fact-checking, and once it has been cleared by our newsroom you can take it to air’.”

“Radio follows those basic journalistic principals of substantiating a story,” he continues. “When you’re working with trained credible journalists who know how to do their job and check facts, in the era in the fake news, it’s what makes radio journalism very important. It’s immediate, it’s live, but it’s also substantiated therefore it’s credible.”

Buchanan says Kiwi’s local connection to our on-air announcers shows that for us human connectivity sits at a high importance for audiences.

“Human connection in radio is everything, the ability to empathise, sympathise, share emotion and be inquisitive. All our talent has the natural ability to go on air and entertain, but they can shift during times of crisis. What they can do is reflect the mood, share experiences and help people cope. Again, that’s a human connection you can’t get through most other mediums, including algorithm-run social channels.”

Cridland agrees that announcers personability will always be a driving point of radio, no matter how technology changes consumption habits.

“Radio in New Zealand has a stronger hold on its audience just because of how our radio announcers have a relatable talent that listeners like.”

Buchanan had a similar outlook for how audio will evolve on our shores, stating that its uncertainty is what makes it exciting. Yet sticking to basic principles of creating and proving great content through great people is what it comes down to.

“Who knows what the future holds for audio. Anything can come up. But what we do know is that regardless of new technology, and regardless of the new devices, we’re still going to need great talent making great content. The power of local personalities will grow, but as for technology who the hell knows. But what’s exciting is that it is a great time to be in media, and it’s an amazing time to be in audio.”

For more information visit www.trb.co.nz

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My New Year’s resolution is to be more polarising https://stoppress.co.nz/opinion/my-new-years-resolution-is-to-be-more-polarising/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=my-new-years-resolution-is-to-be-more-polarising https://stoppress.co.nz/opinion/my-new-years-resolution-is-to-be-more-polarising/#respond Wed, 15 Jan 2020 21:20:00 +0000 https://stoppress.co.nz/?p=36599 Owen Farrell’s smirk. The English ‘Flying V’ in the face of the Haka. The most polarising sporting moment of the year. Some loved it. Some hated it (including me). Everyone spoke about it. Nobody will forget it. —- Consensus is a dangerous concept in the world of marketing communications. We seek consensus all of the [...]

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Owen Farrell’s smirk.

The English ‘Flying V’ in the face of the Haka.

The most polarising sporting moment of the year.

Some loved it.

Some hated it (including me).

Everyone spoke about it.

Nobody will forget it.

—-

Consensus is a dangerous concept in the world of marketing communications.

We seek consensus all of the time.

Creative agencies seek to come to one around the creative work they present.

Clients seek to come to an agreement on an idea they all equally think is right.

Consumers are often asked if they all like and understand an idea in research.

My provocation is…

Can we really deliver outstanding creative work, if we all agree that it is outstanding?

—-

In response to criticism of his remarks at the Golden Globe Awards, Ricky Gervais tweeted:

‘Just because you are offended, doesn’t mean you are right.’

—-

My handwriting is terrible, so I often write notes, presentation outlines and even articles like this on my phone.

I often find words of (perceived) wisdom that I wrote to myself many months before.

This is a note to myself that I believe I wrote in a research debrief, sometime last year…

“Idea seen as too polarising – word misused.”

—-

I don’t love US or British Politics right now.

But irrespective of my own or your views, the political strategists of the reigning parties have turned politics on its head.

Far from aiming to please everyone, they’ve firmly taken a side and refused to pander to the other.

They’ve understood that standing for something and taking sides cuts through and is often more likely to resonate with people (at the expense of it not resonating with everyone).

Unlike the recent Labour UK party election bid that failed to take a stance on Brexit.

By trying to appeal to everyone, they failed to appeal to anyone.

—-

“What was Nike thinking?”

  • @realDonaldTrump

Trump’s tweet after seeing Colin Kaepernick, the civil rights activist and American Football Player’s Nike ad.

Nike won an Emmy, earned $163 million in PR, created a brand value increase of $6 billion, and had a 31% boost in sales.

I think that’s what they were thinking.

Coincidentally, the line – ‘Believe in something. Even if it means sacrificing everything’ – wasn’t actually just a line.

It summed up the polarising approach that Nike took, where the reward and risk were both high.

—-

A common argument in my household is about Marmite.

Seeing it on the butter dish is my pet hate.

I reluctantly put it on toast for my daughter.

There’s not many things I could think of that I’d be more repulsed by eating.

BBH London recently ran a Twitter competition called the ‘World Cup of Endlines’.

There were some amazing contenders before being whittled down to two.

Specsavers (‘Should’ve gone to Specsavers’) narrowly lost out to Marmite.

Because ‘Love it or Hate It’, even for someone like me, it’s hard to disagree that the decision to make a virtue of its polarising nature was a stroke of genius.

—-

One of the outstanding creative achievements of the previous decade has been for the tampon brand Libresse (also known as Bodyform).

The brand purpose – ‘Live Fearless’ – has led to multiple award winning campaigns such as ‘Blood Normal’ and the outstanding ‘Viva La Vulva’.

The degree of difficulty to do outstanding creative work in a category like this is enough to be envious of it alone.

It’s a category filled with taboos and paralysed by archaic regulation and conservative advertising.

The team behind it were rightly awarded the coveted APG Grand Prix for Creative Strategy in the UK last year.

The APG paper itself charts the journey of how ‘Live Fearless’ became a rallying cry to women to live the life they want without letting periods hold them back.

And it wasn’t easy.

They polarised clients.

They polarised stakeholders.

They polarised viewers.

Watch the work and you will see why.

But in their words, it was worthwhile because:

“Sometimes, it’s worth pissing some people off –

if it’s making things right for so many more.”

—-

There’s little argument that it’s becoming more difficult to command attention in advertising.

That requires a braver approach from us all.

I’d rather make work that genuinely makes some people feel something, than appease everyone with work that nobody will remember or pay attention to.

That’s what we are here to do.

If it means we all need to disagree from time to time, in pursuit of greater success for the brands we work on, so be it.

So my new year’s resolution is this.

I’m going to be a bit more easy going about the Marmite in the butter dish.

It feels like it’s time to save my polarising points of view for the strategies I develop, the creative reviews I sit in, the client presentations I give and most importantly, the work that I help to send out into the world.

But don’t worry, I promise to do it all without that Farrell-like smirk on my face.

Rory Gallery is the Head of Strategy at Special Group

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Year in Review: Daniel Hopkirk, Crave Global https://stoppress.co.nz/news/year-in-review-daniel-hopkirk-crave-agency/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=year-in-review-daniel-hopkirk-crave-agency https://stoppress.co.nz/news/year-in-review-daniel-hopkirk-crave-agency/#respond Wed, 15 Jan 2020 21:00:00 +0000 https://stoppress.co.nz/?p=36496 Every year, StopPress asks players in the local industry for their reflections on the marketing year that was. Here’s what Daniel Hopkirk, managing director of Crave Global, had to say. 1. What is your favourite local campaign that isn’t yours Uber Eats Shark Bait is pretty hard to go past. Very clever, impactful and catches [...]

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Every year, StopPress asks players in the local industry for their reflections on the marketing year that was. Here’s what Daniel Hopkirk, managing director of Crave Global, had to say.

1. What is your favourite local campaign that isn’t yours

Uber Eats Shark Bait is pretty hard to go past. Very clever, impactful and catches attention.

2. What is your favourite campaign that is yours

OLAxZAMBESI – we partnered with NZ Fashion Week to realign rideshare brand Ola alongside iconic label Zambesi.  The fully integrated campaign included TVC, OOH, activation, PR and social.  It was a bold campaign for a challenger brand looking to make a big impact.

3. What is your favourite international campaign 

Changing the Game by Microsoft is brilliant. If you haven’t seen it check it out.

I love that they are utilising innovation in their brand to create opportunities for people with disabilities.

4. What is your least favourite campaign 

It is easy to bag other agencies work, but you never know the whole picture so we don’t!

5. What is your own biggest success in 2019?

Having a baby boy and juggling everyday life.

6. For you, what is the most significant launch/innovation/thing of the year?

Plastic Bag removal from Supermarkets. Short term pain, long term gain.

7. What should be un-invented? 

All kids toys that make noises.

8. What do you think is the lamest trend?

Boomer chat.

9. What are your best brands?

Speights – I love what they are doing with the brand. Their latest advert ‘The Dance’ celebrates mate-ship in an unexpected way. Brave for a traditionally blokey brand to do something different like this.

Whittaker’s – The way in which they use partnerships to innovate and delve into new territories with their brand is really powerful. Cross pollenating with other kiwi brands to capitalise on the equity in both brands is clever.

10. Best stoush for you this year? 

Folau vs Rugby Australia

11. Who are the Heroes?

Greta Thunberg / Dance For Abilities / Zakk D’Larte

12. Who are the Villains 

Donald Trump, Prince Andrew, Israel Folau, English Cricket/Rugby (both beating us in World Cups!)

13. What died in 2019? 

Our Creative Directors brand new iPhone 11. Turns out they can’t be run over 4 times and survive. RIP.

14. What’s the biggest mistake agencies will make in 2020? 

Not getting close enough to clients businesses.

With the changing advertising landscape I believe the key is in really understanding the commercial debates that marketers deal with internally and arming them with brave creative work that helps build stronger revenue streams to make them famous in their organisation.

15: If there were no laws for 24 hours, what would you do?

Change the balance of power by redistributing bank funds – some might find its way to me…

Year in Review is brought to you by oOh!media.

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