stoppress.co.nz https://stoppress.co.nz StopPress provides essential industry news and intelligence, updated daily. Thu, 28 May 2020 22:06:05 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.4.1 https://i0.wp.com/stoppress.co.nz/wp-content/uploads/2019/08/StopPress-Favicon.png?fit=32%2C32&ssl=1 stoppress.co.nz https://stoppress.co.nz 32 32 9249403 oOh!media moves Vile up to executive leadership team https://stoppress.co.nz/news/oohmedia-moves-vile-up-to-executive-leadership-team/ https://stoppress.co.nz/news/oohmedia-moves-vile-up-to-executive-leadership-team/#respond Thu, 28 May 2020 22:05:12 +0000 https://stoppress.co.nz/?p=39104 Nick Vile has made a move up the ladder with the promotion to be part of oOh!media’s executive leadership team. Vile’s move is set to create a greater connection between offices across the Tasman, with CEO Brendon Cook saying the move will help oOh! succeed in our post pandemic landscape. “COVID-19 has had a profound [...]

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Nick Vile has made a move up the ladder with the promotion to be part of oOh!media’s executive leadership team.

Vile’s move is set to create a greater connection between offices across the Tasman, with CEO Brendon Cook saying the move will help oOh! succeed in our post pandemic landscape.

“COVID-19 has had a profound effect on the business – it challenged us to work together in new ways and adapt our business at pace to meet the new reality,” Mr Cook said.

“It has also highlighted how we could streamline our service delivery through realigning functions and ultimately enhance our offering to market… By elevating Nick to our leadership team, we will not only enhance our product offering in New Zealand, but also boost revenue opportunities and results for advertisers by aligning great work and ideas from both countries.”

Mr Vile’s appointment to the ELT takes effect from 1 June 2020.

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Marketing in Lockdown – Coming June 2 https://stoppress.co.nz/news/marketing-in-lockdown-coming-june-2/ https://stoppress.co.nz/news/marketing-in-lockdown-coming-june-2/#respond Thu, 28 May 2020 03:03:28 +0000 https://stoppress.co.nz/?p=39096 NZ Marketing has announced the release of a speciality E-issue, Marketing in Lockdown. MARKETING IN LOCKDOWN Reaching and retaining customers while in a nationwide Lockdown, amidst a global pandemic, meant that marketers had to come up with bold and innovative solutions to keep brands alive. Industry experts predict that the same bold approach is going to [...]

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NZ Marketing has announced the release of a speciality E-issue, Marketing in Lockdown.

MARKETING IN LOCKDOWN

Reaching and retaining customers while in a nationwide Lockdown, amidst a global pandemic, meant that marketers had to come up with bold and innovative solutions to keep brands alive.

Industry experts predict that the same bold approach is going to be needed for many months to come as marketers look to re-engage their customers.  

In this special ‘Marketing in Lockdown’ digital supplement produced by NZ Marketing magazine, we talk to leaders within the marcomms industry, as well as across a wide range of sectors including travel, tourism, retail and financial – to hear their insights on brand strategy during Lockdown, where the industry is headed and how they intend to adapt in a vastly different world.

Going live on June 2, Marketing in Lockdown will be available for purchase and download at the cool price of $2.99 AUD.

Links to the issue will be promoted across StopPress June 2.

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Go global or stay local? Part one https://stoppress.co.nz/features/go-global-or-stay-local-part-one/ https://stoppress.co.nz/features/go-global-or-stay-local-part-one/#respond Wed, 27 May 2020 23:11:23 +0000 https://stoppress.co.nz/?p=39085 Graham Medcalf talks to intrepid independent-agency owners and some globally-aligned stalwarts to interrogate the advantages and disadvantages of advertising independence. __________________________________ “We have the best people doing the best work in the best environment we can create,” boasted John Steedman, executive director of WPP AUNZ, in an AdNews interview at the end of 2019. But [...]

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Graham Medcalf talks to intrepid independent-agency owners and some globally-aligned stalwarts to interrogate the advantages and disadvantages of advertising independence.

__________________________________

“We have the best people doing the best work in the best environment we can create,” boasted John Steedman, executive director of WPP AUNZ, in an AdNews interview at the end of 2019. But is that true? Are global agencies employing the best people and doing the best work? Or is it a case of good people spread between independent agencies and the multinationals?

Certainly, there is validity in the contention that the global giants have the edge when it comes to training and development, but isn’t this often a case of bringing younger employees up to speed while some of the best talent heads off to create their own agencies and work for themselves in a free, more inspiring environment that best serves their innate creative talent.

In true advertising speak, Peter Hogan, chief executive of Omnicom Media Group Australia and New Zealand, told AdNews in the same issue: “Agencies need to improve their navigation across the consumer journey and hone their attribution capabilities to prove and drive a marketing return.”

In New Zealand’s independent agency environment, we are a bit more down to earth and the success of the local independents centres on creating long-term client relationships, based on a personal relationship with senior people rather than depending on international alignments.

While it seems a number of the major marketing companies feel safer dealing with big name agencies, this comes at a cost in terms of speed and fees. Indies have to build their reputation over time and through the work they do, showing that they can do it again and again and again.

Without question the resources made available through global alignment give a substantial advantage but being in a group-aligned agency environment often makes it surprisingly difficult for smaller subsidiaries, in markets like New Zealand, to benefit fully from what the networks are able to provide. Promises of access to all sorts of IP can be difficult to attain and the reality is it often doesn’t fit with the local market.

Having said that, there are plenty of benefits which local independent business-owners envy, especially the investment in operational infrastructure like finance and HR. 

Indies miss out on global new business. As Rufus Chuter, chief executive of Together, told NZ Marketing: “This can be a double-edged sword as sometimes the global deals aren’t in smaller markets’ favour.”

It is always nice to be handed business and access to global research is of great value. Although it isn’t impossible to build similar and more relevant tools locally.

In attracting the best talent, independents have to work harder to provide their people with development opportunities, especially overseas. The ability to transfer within a network has always been a draw-card for people wanting an OE or to experience life working in another market. This is not impossible to achieve as an independent, but it is harder.

While himself benefiting from international alignment, FCB chief creative officer Tony Clewett admits a healthy mixture of independent and global agencies helps contribute to New Zealand’s brilliant advertising landscape and keeps the big boys on their toes. “This country has a fantastic reputation for its innovation and creative thinking, so the current mix of both certainly seems to be working.”

It’s true an agency like FCB has certain advantages when it comes to partnering with larger clients – with access to the aforementioned global resources and best practices, but there’s also plenty of local businesses looking for similar-minded local agencies.

Tony Bradbourne, co-founder of Special Group, agrees. His contention is that the whole ‘independent’ vs ‘non-independent’ debate is a bit out of date.

Tony Bradbourne

“At Special we now have over 100 staff over two offices in Auckland and Sydney (and more to come). We work on some of the world’s biggest brands – Red Bull, Uber, Uber Eats, Smirnoff, Tourism New Zealand, Disney Plus, etc. So, I personally think the debate should really be ‘Is it ‘time’s up’ for traditional multi-national agencies?”

What he alludes to is true. A great independent is obviously better than a poor multinational and vice versa. Better, is always better.

“An independent agency spends more time focusing on their client’s business, and their own business, rather than wasting a single minute constantly reporting back to foreign headquarters or sending request forms to Sydney or New York for approval before you can buy a paperclip, let alone a new laptop for a new valuable staff member. We all know the stories,” Bradbourne says.

There is a counter to this view. Although being part of a larger network, agencies like FCB and DDB in New Zealand have always run and acted more like independent agencies. Sometimes our distance from the rest of the world can be a distinct advantage.

The excellent creative work being offered under the direction of Clewett at FCB and by Damon Stapleton, DDB regional chief creative officer for Australia and New Zealand, has probably less to do with global alignment than with the undoubted creative talent of the individuals concerned.

Across his decorated career, Stapleton’s creative leadership and ability has earned him substantial recognition both regionally and around the world. Stapleton has won more than 500 international awards including 60 Cannes Lions (including a Titanium, Innovation and Grand Prix). 35 of those have been won in the last five years at DDB NZ, but his talent was bought, so to speak, by an astute DDB Australia/New Zealand chairman and chief executive Marty O’Halloran.

Having a heritage

In all the talk about finance, client relationships, strategy, head office reporting and the business side of the industry, we often forget that the creative product is the central dynamic of advertising and regardless of the proliferation of delivery channels in the 21st century, the big idea, like in the Mad Men days of the 50s, 60s and 70s is still where the rubber meets the road.

That moment when you realise that Huxley the dog in the Vodafone 5G ad is not going to be put to sleep; or the tug on the heartstrings when the little boy tearing down the beach, being pursued by a lifeguard, smiles at the camera in the Sky Sport ad, is when you understand storytelling is what we do.

Storytelling and the passion and competence in the way we deliver it is what makes great advertising. And it doesn’t really matter whether you are working at an independent or global agency, whether you are big or small, talent is where success diverges from mediocrity.

Stapleton oversaw both the Vodafone and Sky Sport campaigns. The resource that a network agency like DDB gives him certainly helps but his talent was developed elsewhere in a different market and one tends to think that the awards and great advertising are a confluence of innate talent and the development of that talent under the tutelage of John Hunt at Hunt Lascaris TBWA in South Africa, as much as the freedom and resource given to create good work under the strong business management of DDB NZ chief executive Justin Mowday.

It was Hunt, in an interview with NZ Marketing in 2010, when he was here to judge the Axis Awards, who commented: “It’s peculiar, there’s more fresh, original thinking happening on the outskirts of the empire rather than in those over-structured, torturous, heavy-laden, big city agencies like London and New York.”

What he meant was that in countries like New Zealand, Australia and South Africa, the quality of advertising produced, exceeds the size of the industry in those countries and is created despite, not because of, international ownership. Globally-aligned agencies in this country in particular, act more like independents than multinationals.

“Winning awards and creating great advertising has more to do with the ethos of the agency than anything else.”

Stapleton says to NZ Marketing.

“Whether you are in an independent agency or part of a global network, it always comes down to the intention of the place in which you are working. When I worked at Hunt Lascaris, it was very clear what the rules were. The building had memory, you knew you had to perform, you had to do great, not just good work.”

Many who have worked in network agencies have experienced a situation where the ‘intention’ was not clear, and the heritage of consistent great work is not there.

At DDB NZ Stapleton works in a well-resourced agency, with a lot of capability, the right intention and a heritage of award-winning work. This makes it easier to continue in that mould.

Damon Stapleton

“The ethos of the network gives a road map,” he says. “I get exposed to things globally, where I see what’s happening in Europe, New York and elsewhere. I guess it’s a fusion between the capability of the agency you are in, with the philosophy of the network.”

There is no doubt that there are great agencies in bad networks and bad agencies in predominantly good networks, but the sweet spot is where you have both. An agency is not a building, it is the people who work there, and talent determines the quality of the offering. With talent comes passion, and a great agency, whether an independent or a networked agency, creates the environment where the talent and passion can be expressed. Agency people work long hours and if you take the passion out of the agency, you will not succeed. You can’t teach people to care. Passion is the driver for success.

“There is a conundrum with creative artistry,” Stapleton says. “You have to make money and deliver a return. But the way you make a profit is counter-intuitive. By doing things that don’t make sense to the guys with spreadsheets, is how you make the spreadsheets better.”

With the independents, the passion lies in ownership and there is something about ‘independence’ that attracts some of the best creative thinkers. Dave Droga, John Hegarty, Dan Wieden, Mark Waites, Stef Calcraft, Libby Brockhoff, and Robert Saville – all started and ran or run independent agencies. Wieden & Kennedy and Mother are still fiercely independent and leading the world with their work.

Bradbourne has a strong belief that the agencies that produce the creative work that moves the entire industry forward – are all independent. But again, seeing the stature of the work coming out of some of the local, globally-aligned network agencies, I would disagree. Talent at whatever agency is what moves the industry forward and you can find this across the board. As Jamie Hitchcock, creative partner at The Enthusiasts, commented to NZ Marketing: “The point is that independent or global, it all comes back to the quality of the people working on the business.”

Bradbourne has a right to his view. Special Group opened in Sydney five years ago to provide the same level of strategic and creative thinking for their clients on both sides of the Tasman. Special Group now has over 100 people across the two offices and work with Tourism New Zealand, Red Bull and Uber Eats in both countries and has won ‘Agency of the Year’ titles in both markets.

Regardless, many an indie owner or independent talent dream of being bought by a global entity and the examples of multinational agencies buying up successful independents cover decades. As recently as August this past year Publicis Groupe ANZ announced the acquisition of New Zealand independent, full-service media agency MBM.

Michael Rebelo, chief executive of Publicis Groupe ANZ, told StopPress: “New Zealand is an important growth market for the Groupe and the acquisition of MBM is the first in a series of investments we will be making in the region to further strengthen our existing brands and grow new capabilities here.”

So, the desire for the global agencies to absorb local, independent talent is as prevalent as ever.

Speaking to NZ Marketing, Rebelo is adamant that the only thing MBM, and another acquisition, Affinity ID, have really lost in joining the Publicis Groupe is their independence on paper.

“The last thing we would do after buying two incredibly successful companies full of talented people and winning business, is to come in and start telling them what to do. We want to amplify and strengthen their offering, learn from them and enable them to do more of what they do best, then get out of the way and let them do it.”

Scale and access to additional expertise is a gain and the two former indies now have the ability to work together with our other agencies, under the Publicis “Power of One” offering. They are already working with fellow group agencies Saatchi & Saatchi, Starcom and Zenith.

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Energy Online and Contagion spark savings initiative https://stoppress.co.nz/news/energy-online-and-contagion-spark-savings-initiative/ https://stoppress.co.nz/news/energy-online-and-contagion-spark-savings-initiative/#respond Wed, 27 May 2020 21:12:50 +0000 https://stoppress.co.nz/?p=39058 Energy Online and Contagion’s isolation campaign features a series of five ads demonstrating ways people could go about saving. With the country in financial distress, now couldn’t be a better time to begin saving some dosh. Priding themselves on their great value, Energy Online suggest switching to them, as oppose to other power companies. Using [...]

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Energy Online and Contagion’s isolation campaign features a series of five ads demonstrating ways people could go about saving.

With the country in financial distress, now couldn’t be a better time to begin saving some dosh. Priding themselves on their great value, Energy Online suggest switching to them, as oppose to other power companies.

Using the brand characters Dave and Derrick, who launched at the end of 2019, the campaign was filmed remotely via LA and New Zealand.

Contagion’s executive creative director, Bridget Taylor, says as an agency it is important to be there for clients in a time like this.

“We pitched this idea on day two of lockdown, along with a full strategic pathway forward in these strange and stressful times. What I’m most proud of is the extraordinary collaboration, trust and innovative thinking that made it happen.

“Our director was in Perth, the producer in London, our actor Dave filming himself and doing sound from his flat in Wellington, our second talent Derrick doing the same from LA and myself, the team and our client all from our individual bubbles around Auckland.”

Energy Online marketing manager, Michael Wood, says the team have started to see positive results already.

“All five online films went live on Friday and they’ve clearly resonated with people and their new lives in lockdown. It’s great we could get this work out in such challenging times.”

CREDITS:

Clients:   Michael Wood and Justine Fairlie

Contagion

Contagion Media

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FCB sees Wall and Vegas step up to ECD https://stoppress.co.nz/news/fcb-sees-wall-and-vegas-step-up-to-ecd/ https://stoppress.co.nz/news/fcb-sees-wall-and-vegas-step-up-to-ecd/#respond Wed, 27 May 2020 03:38:06 +0000 https://stoppress.co.nz/?p=39064 FCB has announced today the promotion of Peter Vegas and Leisa Wall to the position of executive creative directors. The creative duo have been moved to the join role, following their 2019 promotion to creative directors. CEO Paul Shale said, “I am thrilled that Leisa Wall and Peter Vegas agreed to be our co-Creative Leads. [...]

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FCB has announced today the promotion of Peter Vegas and Leisa Wall to the position of executive creative directors.

The creative duo have been moved to the join role, following their 2019 promotion to creative directors.

CEO Paul Shale said, “I am thrilled that Leisa Wall and Peter Vegas agreed to be our co-Creative Leads. Leisa and Vegas are a formidable powerhouse who now have a mandate to make an immense difference to FCB NZ. They’re without ego, hungry for great work, and dedicated to taking our clients and people to the next level.”

Speaking on behalf of the creative pair, Wall said, “Vegas and I very conscious of the extra responsibility that comes with adding an E to the front of our titles. But we’re excited about the challenges that this post Covid environment is creating for the industry. We’re looking forward to continuing the great work and culture that Tony Clewett helped create in the agency, just with slightly better hair styles.”

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Howdy, bro. BC&F Dentsu and Tegel merge cultures in new campaign https://stoppress.co.nz/news/howdy-bro-bcf-dentsu-and-tegel-merge-cultures-in-new-campaign/ https://stoppress.co.nz/news/howdy-bro-bcf-dentsu-and-tegel-merge-cultures-in-new-campaign/#respond Wed, 27 May 2020 03:16:49 +0000 https://stoppress.co.nz/?p=39035 To draw the connection between Louisiana and New Zealand, Tegel and BC&F Dentsu have released a campaign with an added translation to help get the message across. The new spot for Tegel’s Take Out’s American range is a fun play on our very different dialects. The campaign itself was created during lockdown, which managing partner [...]

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To draw the connection between Louisiana and New Zealand, Tegel and BC&F Dentsu have released a campaign with an added translation to help get the message across.

The new spot for Tegel’s Take Out’s American range is a fun play on our very different dialects. The campaign itself was created during lockdown, which managing partner Luke Farmer says wasn’t the hardest part.

“This was definitely a tough campaign…mainly because I was constantly hungry. I’m super proud of the relationship we have with Tegel that allowed us to work in a true partnership and deliver this campaign under the circumstances.”

The work was carried out along side production company, Toybox, who Farmer says did an outstanding job on the campaign.

Clem de Ruiter and Guy Perry, the creatives behind the work, say some serious bubble-based research went into the finial product. 

“What came up frequently in our DIY-from home research groups was that this product was ‘yum as’. We also discovered that cooking it was ‘easy as’. Upon further inspection, both points were found to be correct.” 

Angela Irwin, head of marketing at Tegel says the translation was done in a way that Kiwis would understand and appreciate.

The team did an awesome job of executing this all during the lockdown period, which is something to be proud of.” 

I’m not sure how fast a baby gator can run from its mama, you’d have to measure the babies leg span vs mama’s weight distribution while running at speed. BC&F Dentsu have pointed out that its the Louisanna version of ‘It’s easy as,” and seeing as gators can run 32km/h, that’s fast as hell.

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A rise in domestic abuse prompts new Chillbox and Shine campaign https://stoppress.co.nz/news/a-rise-in-domestic-abuse-prompts-new-chillbox-and-shine-campaign/ https://stoppress.co.nz/news/a-rise-in-domestic-abuse-prompts-new-chillbox-and-shine-campaign/#respond Wed, 27 May 2020 01:05:11 +0000 https://stoppress.co.nz/?p=39037 Domestic violence service provider Shine and Chillbox Creative have come together to launch a campaign encouraging people to look out for signs of domestic abuse within their friends, colleagues, and family members. Shine’s campaign, titled ‘It isn’t always obvious’ spotlights cases where abusers control their partner’s movements, finances, or ability to go to work. Launching [...]

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Domestic violence service provider Shine and Chillbox Creative have come together to launch a campaign encouraging people to look out for signs of domestic abuse within their friends, colleagues, and family members.

Shine’s campaign, titled ‘It isn’t always obvious’ spotlights cases where abusers control their partner’s movements, finances, or ability to go to work. Launching online and across billboards, the campaign shows brief text message conversations between a woman and her friend that appear innocent, however, they are based on real-life situations of abuse.

One text reads “Nah, he doesn’t like it when I’m out late”, with another reading “Sorry, this is Sara now. John uses my phone sometimes.”

The campaign comes as a response to the significant rise in domestic abuse in recent months, with Shine working more intensively and longer hours to meet the safety needs of clients.

Shine acting general manager, Sally Ward, says it’s important for friends and family to be aware of warning signs of abuse and how to act upon them.

“The signs are often very subtle.  This campaign is about raising awareness about how abuse at home is not always physical and, even if there are physical elements, they may not be easy to recognise from the outside.

“We’re asking people to look out for their loved ones. In particular, watch for signs of unequal power or control in a relationship as this may indicate that something is not right.”

Shine reports that many people who experience domestic violence say emotional and psychological abuse can be just as bad as physical, if not worse, and can be harder to recover from in the long term.

“If you think someone may be in a situation where their partner is trying to control their movements, activities or work attendance, check in with the person,” says Ward.

“The next step is to call Shine helping for guidance. That’s what we are here for, we know what to do and how to help.”

The concept behind the campaign was created and developed by Chillbox Creative, who with the recent spike in domestic violence, knew there was an urgency to develop an approach that would have a real impact.

“In developing our concepts, we wanted to provide a fresh perspective and encourage New Zealanders to re-evaluate their assumptions about domestic abuse,” says Gabriel Lunte, creative director at Chillbox Creative.

“The work Shine does is invaluable, and we consider it a privilege to have played even a small part in their ongoing efforts to eliminate domestic violence in New Zealand.”

Suncorp New Zealand and Westpac have jumped on board in support of the campaign, with Suncorp making an additional one off $100,000 donation to support Shine during the Covid-19 crisis.

Westpac has previously helped Shine co-create a free online education tool for employers and employees and in 2017 was the first corporation in New Zealand to receive Shine’s DVFREE workplace tick.

Gina Dellabarca, Westpac’s general manager consumer banking and wealth, says Westpac is supporting Shine’s latest campaign in the hope more New Zealander’s will recognise warning signs and ultimately put a stop to domestic abuse.

“As a DVFREE employer we have avenues for our people to safely let us know if they are experiencing violence or abuse at home and tools to support them.

“We’re supporting this campaign because we want to help more New Zealanders recognise some of the signs of abusive or controlling behaviour, so they are better equipped to help friends and family in need.” 

Campaign videos can be seen on Shines’s Facebook and Instagram pages, as well as Youtube, while Digital LED billboards will light up Auckland city for a week.

As well as providing practical, frontline support for adult victims and their children, Shine also aims to raise $25,000 for those in need to get safe and stay safe.

If you suspect a friend, family member or colleague is unsafe in their relationship, you can call the Shine helpline for advice on how to help.

You can go to 2shine.org.nz to find different ways to safely help your loved one with emotional and practical support. 

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ICG Media grows with new hires https://stoppress.co.nz/news/icg-media-grows-with-new-hires/ https://stoppress.co.nz/news/icg-media-grows-with-new-hires/#respond Wed, 27 May 2020 01:01:20 +0000 https://stoppress.co.nz/?p=39004 ICG Media, part of Image Centre Group, has welcomed in a coo of new hires this week. The roles work across Liquorland Toast, Habitat by Resene and ICG Media’s digital development team. Not just a coat of paint Bea Taylor joins the team as the new content producer for Habitat by Resene. Taylor, who comes [...]

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ICG Media, part of Image Centre Group, has welcomed in a coo of new hires this week. The roles work across Liquorland Toast, Habitat by Resene and ICG Media’s digital development team.

Not just a coat of paint

Bea Taylor joins the team as the new content producer for Habitat by Resene. Taylor, who comes from a position as the deputy editor of Your Home & Garden, says she is looking forward to flexing her writing in the home decor space.

“I’m really looking forward to writing about what I know best of homes and interiors – and maybe soon I’ll be able to walk into a room and identify the Resene colour on the wall (party trick?)”

LauraGrace McFarland, senior account director – content publishing for ICG Media says the Habitat by Resene team are looking forward to benefiting from her experience.

“We are super excited to welcome Bea to the team as our new content producer for Habitat by Resene. With her specialised experience in content creation for the home category, we are looking forward to inspiring more people to create their dream spaces.”

Cheers to that

Taking up editorship of Liquorland Toast is a return to publishing for Catherine Milford.

Prior to this, Milford has worked across several print and lifestyle titles in both a permanent and freelance capacity. Her previous roles include editorships at World of Wine magazine and Food magazine, and deputy editorships at Woman’s Day, New Zealand Woman’s Weekly and New Idea. She also runs her own food and drink social media platform, @eatscooksreads.

“Having specialised in the food and drink sector for a number of years, both in publishing and communication, the move to Liquorland Toast is an exciting challenge for me,” says Milford. “We have access to so many stunning wines, beers and spirits, and there are many exciting innovations constantly happening across the industry. I’m delighted to be part of the team.”

Growing digitally

The wider ICG Media team has also welcomed in Emily Nicholas as its new digital development manager.

Previously at Bauer Media for four years, Nicholas started out as a digital campaign manager and then moved to a digital product manager role.

“I managed Bauer New Zealand’s digital platforms, delivering a variety of digital projects, spanning major new launches, existing product optimisation and bespoke product development,” she says.

“I’m feeling really fortunate to be able to work for some awesome brands at ICG Media. I’m really looking forward to being able to share my experiences and knowledge and to brush off the lockdown cobwebs to work on some exciting new projects.”

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Out of Home continues its trajectory https://stoppress.co.nz/news/out-of-home-continues-its-trajectory/ https://stoppress.co.nz/news/out-of-home-continues-its-trajectory/#respond Tue, 26 May 2020 22:06:10 +0000 https://stoppress.co.nz/?p=39026 OMANZ has reported following data collected by the ASA that Out of Home advertising has continued its upwards climb. The sector has seen four years worth of an annual growth rate of over 16 percent  and resulted in Out of Home’s share of the New Zealand advertising spend grow from 5.34 percent to 6.29 percent.  [...]

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OMANZ has reported following data collected by the ASA that Out of Home advertising has continued its upwards climb.

The sector has seen four years worth of an annual growth rate of over 16 percent  and resulted in Out of Home’s share of the New Zealand advertising spend grow from 5.34 percent to 6.29 percent. 

 OMANZ General Manager, Natasha O’Connor said, “2019 saw our members, and the wider Out of Home community, continue with their commitment to developing portfolios of world class digital sites, which in turn was embraced by the advertising industry and led to outstanding creative campaigns using the attributes of digital technology to its full potential.” 

2019 also saw our static platform stabilise, an indication that advertisers appreciate that the classic format remains a cost-effective channel to build audience reach. 

O’Connor continues, “while we are all seeing, and feeling, the disruption of COVID 19, the combination of Out of Home’s ongoing growth trajectory and the long term fragmentation in traditional media, will support a positive rebound in the medium- to long-term for Out of Home. 

OMANZ members are unified in their focus on the key strategic pillars of standards, leadership, and innovation. In addition to this, with further development towards a unified approach to audience measurement we will be more accountable for audience delivery than ever before.” 

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Mi9’s Jon Devereux answers your top programmatic questions https://stoppress.co.nz/news/mi9s-jon-devereux-answers-your-top-programmatic-questions/ https://stoppress.co.nz/news/mi9s-jon-devereux-answers-your-top-programmatic-questions/#respond Tue, 26 May 2020 21:46:40 +0000 https://stoppress.co.nz/?p=39017 You asked, he answered. Here, Mi9’s Jon Devereux give us his advice on forecasted trends, suggestions for ad spend, and the do’s and don’t all things programmatic. Any thoughts on trends to look out for coming out of Lockdown? In terms of overall market trends, we are still seeing significantly more supply relative to demand, [...]

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You asked, he answered. Here, Mi9’s Jon Devereux give us his advice on forecasted trends, suggestions for ad spend, and the do’s and don’t all things programmatic.

  1. Any thoughts on trends to look out for coming out of Lockdown?

In terms of overall market trends, we are still seeing significantly more supply relative to demand, which I believe presents a buying opportunity for some industries.  This is driven largely by a few industries remaining offline such as Airlines, Travel and Tourism and an increase in site traffic looking for News updates.

On the other side retail, mostly Retail (eCommerce), and Telecoms have weathered the storm well, with spend either near or exceeding pre-COVID-19 levels.

Finance spend across the market remains subdued, which looks like an opportunity for a bank to fill the void and take a larger than normal share of voice in the market.

In terms of ad tech trends, I think a key focus remains data solutions in a cookie-less world. As the crackdown on third-party cookies continues, we are seeing ad exchanges such as Index Exchange partner with data platforms such as LiveRamp to provide solutions which pass user ID markers in the bid request rather than relying on traditional client-side stored cookies.  With data being such an integral part of programmatic buying and other initiatives such as header bidding and brand safety tools in a more mature and stable place, it feels like a more robust solution for data is going to come to the forefront of the industry, which I believe is a good thing as cookies were never really a great solution to begin with!

  • Hi Jon, what is the best way to collect customer feedback on programmatic ads, how do you suggest analysing the collected?

There are a few ways this can be interpreted; from a publisher perspective the feedback would pertain to the quality of the ads and the impact to user experience on the site. I think realistically in this scenario feedback will be reactive, rather than proactive, and likely negative due to a bad user experience.

A proactive approach on the publisher’s part makes sense here, no obnoxious pop-up ads, and no low quality or scam advertising. Despite what it may seem to the layman site browser, here in New Zealand all publishers I’ve worked with take ad quality and user experience very seriously, there is a constant battle on the publisher side to block scam, unpleasant and illicit ads, naturally the people that are making ads to scam are using tricks to circumvent category blocks imposed by publishers, so publishers need to use a number of manual checks to try and catch the ads as quickly as possible.

From a brand perspective regarding the efficacy of an ad, the data after an ad is seen or clicked is your best bet, having a site well tagged up to record conversions and inform what creative drove the most ROI. Attribution gets a bad rap, because it is impossible to get an absolute result, for example; if you try and attribute ROI based on post-impression, sites that serve more impressions are more likely to be attributed the last-view and will look better in the results. 

Likewise, when attributing based on post-click you usually end up with unfavourable looking data, for example the data might say it takes $200 of ad spend to generate one lead for a product worth $20. This understandably makes agencies and marketing departments reluctant to use it as a source of measurement, but personally I still see value in using this to drive decisions on where to upweight spend based, rather than default to CPC or CTR which might look great at a $1.50 CPC, but means a lot less in reality. In fact, there’s often an inverse relationship between high clickthrough rates and conversions, i.e. most people who buy via ads online do so because the ad is relevant to them and rarely click ads otherwise, whilst there is a subset of people who click a lot of ads with no intention of converting.

  • What are your thoughts on public knowledge of programmatic marketing… do consumers understand how it works. Is this or isn’t this a problem?

Great question, for an average user not in the industry it’s very low, most don’t realise ads are bought and sold on exchanges similar to stock markets. They are aware their data is being used in some capacity, but I think most misunderstand what’s available and in what capacity their data being used, this creates a level of mistrust that I believe is unwarranted. The reality is all data is hashed, anonymous data with no personally identifiable information that gets grouped into large pools.

While there’s absolutely cause for concern with the amount of data certain entities possess internally and the potential risks to individuals that poses, the way I see data being used in day-to-day programmatic advertising is far off what the average layman believes is going on. Other problems include things such as users believing a publisher deliberately uploaded a rude or scam creative for money when the reality is all New Zealand publishers work hard to prevent ads that could hurt their brand or users.

From a marketing perspective I still hear a lot that digital ads are less premium, with the decision to focus spend on more traditional channels.  Obviously I have skin in the game but personally it seems disingenuous how people can be happy to take a hazy, vague and inferred stat about the number of people that saw a non-digital ad at face value, but completely discredit the reams of data available around nearly every aspect of digital ads.

To say digital is a less premium environment would suggest Netflix is less premium TV or Amazon is less premium shopping.  I see digital as the new norm, and a digital environment can be premium just as a non-digital environment can be second-rate.

  • With the current landscape, what are people not wanting to advertise around?

For us, and from what I have heard of other publishers here and in Australia, the main blockers are any COVID-19 related news. Some buyers for government will specifically target towards COVID-19 news, but most advertisers want to avoid it.  Most buyers have extensive blocklists in place for their clients which are always on, using platforms such as IAS, DoubleVerify or Grapeshot to categorise page risk levels.  In terms of what industries are spending, most Retail and Telecoms are above previous levels, making use of eCommerce opportunities which programmatic advertising excels at, while Finance, Autos, Travel and Tourism are still lagging, understandably.

  • is there a solution to the problem of… “I have already brought the shoes, but they continue to follow me – I don’t need that ad anymore”. How does advertising know when to stop?

Technically it is possible, in the same way an advertiser adds you to a list to target to after viewing the shoes, they can add you to another list after you land on the thank you page of the purchase to exclude you from future targeting.

As to why they do not, that is subjective depending on the advertiser, in the case of shoes or online retail, I would imagine it is less effective for eCommerce stores to remove you after purchase. The fact that you’ve made a purchase on their site makes you significantly more likely to re-purchase than a random user, you’ve probably already got an account, card details saved, and trust them enough to deliver the goods etc.

Most eCommerce shops use dynamic banners now that rotate what goods they are advertising, so it is less likely they will continue to serve the same shoes but continue to serve you shoe ads on the assumption you’re still more likely to buy another pair than a random individual.

That said, there is still room for improvement, for example data science could be done to figure out exactly how long between shoe purchases the average user makes on the site, if the average user buys a pair of shoes every 16 weeks there may be better results downweighing spend for a few weeks to prevent wastage and ramp up spend again as you approach the 16th  week.  Likewise with subscription-based services it would make sense to significantly reduce spend on users you know are already subscribed. I get a lot of ads from services I’m subscribed to which just feels like wasted ad spend, and in some cases the ad has even reminded me to cancel the subscription.  I cannot comment on why they do not, it could be lack of knowhow, or an unwillingness to share that data with their agency out of security/privacy concerns, as an example.  I do think the industry has a lot of room for improvement in the data science and optimisation space.

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